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Subject: Quarterly ASCII posting of SCO Programmer's FAQ

This article was archived around: Thu, 11 Feb 2010 00:05:34 -0700 (MST)

All FAQs in Directory: sco
All FAQs posted in: comp.unix.sco.programmer
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Archive-name: sco/programmers-faq Posting-Frequency: quarterly Version: 1.0.3a Last-modified: 2007/11/26 URL: http://www.zenez.com/cgi-bin/scoprogfaq/faq Copyright: (c) 1999-Present SCO Programmer's FAQ Maintainer: Boyd Lynn Gerber <gerberb@zenez.com> Disclaimer: Approval for *.answers is based on form, not content.
comp.unix.sco.programmer "SCO Programmer's FAQ" is best viewed in html because of its format. Please visit our website at http://www.zenez.com/cgi-bin/scoprogfaq/faq SCO Programmer's FAQ ASCII. THE_URL:http://www.zenez.com/cgi-bin/scoprogfaq/faq?_recurse=1 THE_TITLE:SCO comp.unix.sco.programmer FAQ. (Category) SCO comp.unix.sco.programmer FAQ. This services tries to provide answers to the Frequently Asked Questions in news:comp.unix.sco.programmer. A backup of the most important files are on. ftp://ftp.lerctr.org/pub/zenez/ Thanks to Larry Rosenman ler@lerctr.org Since it is based on traffic in that group, it has a definite slant toward the SCO (Caldera) UNIX/OpenDesktop/OpenServer product families. However coverage is given to the UnixWare 7(OpenUNIX 8)/OpenServer 6 and OpenServer Development Kit (UDK) as well. It doesn't try to cover the same ground as the existing FAQs such as The comp.sco.misc FAQ http://aplawrence.com/SCOFAQ/ The comp.unix.programmer FAQ http://www.erlenstar.demon.co.uk/unix/faq_toc.html. Csh Programming Considered Harmful http://www.faqs.org/faqs/unix-faq/shell/csh-whynot/ Raw IP Networking FAQ http://www.whitefang.com/rin/ The UnixWare 7/OpenUNIX 8/OpenServer 6 FAQ. http://www.zenez.com/cgi-bin/ou8faq/faq The UnixWare FAQ http://www.freebird.org/faq/ The UnixWare 1.x and 2.0 Programmer FAQ http://www.freebird.org/faq/developer.html Caldera Support Knowledge Base http://support.caldera.com/caldera or many of the other great FAQs available at http://www.faqs.org It is strongly encouraged that the answers in here address Caldera (SCO) UNIX -specific issues. It is run from the Faq-O-Matic accessable at http://www.zenez.com/cgi-bin/scoprogfaq/faq , which means you can create your own entries and amplify or correct and answers that are here. Notes to contributors: You will need to go to the appearance link at the bottom and click on it. You then select show and show all and then accept. This will allow you to see the options available. You choose the option you want and a new screen will come up asking for your email address and password. You must have an authenticated email address and password. If you have one just enter it and continue. If you do not will need to be added, a email address and password is required to add or make changes to this FAQ. Please help us maintain this FAQ as it is for the entire group. When entering "natural text" where you still want some control over the formatting (as this section) note that blank lines must really be blank (not tabs, not spaces) to start a new paragraph. Subcategories: (Category) SCO Development Environments. (Category) Hardware related programming (Category) Known bugs in SCO Programming Environments. (Category) Third-party Languages and Development Tools for SCO Platforms (Category) Misc for OpenServer 5.0.X and Unixware 7.x.x / OpenUNIX 8.x.x (Category) How to Find FAQ [New Answer in "SCO comp.unix.sco.programmer FAQ."] (Category) (Category) SCO comp.unix.sco.programmer FAQ. : SCO Development Environments. Insert useful description here. What's in this group? Why does it exist? What doesn't belong here? Right now, this group tends to be sort of a "catch-all". It is important to remember that robertl or gerberb are not the FAQ maintainer. YOU are the FAQ maintainer. If you're tired of answering a question or seeing it answered in news:comp.unix.sco.programmer it is your duty as a good net.citizen to plonk the answer into this FAQ. As you find useful information for programming on SCO OS's, Please add it to this FAQ. THANKS! robertlipe@usa.net, gerberb@zenez.com Answers in this category: (Answer) I have a 3.2v4.2 (or earlier) based system. I don't have a compiler. What are my options? (Answer) I have a 3.2v4 OS and the SCO 3.2v4 DS. I'm trying to build something and seem to be missing headers and libraries. (Answer) I have an OpenServer based system. I don't have a compiler. What are my options? (Answer) I tried to build GCC on OpenServer 5 and it burst into flames. (Answer) Issues with GDB on OpenServer and UnixWare. (Answer) How can I build XENIX or DOS binaries on my OpenServer system? (Answer) Can I generate binaries that run on older sysem on OpenServer? (Answer) Will ELF binaries compiled on OpenServer run on anything else? (Answer) Link errors on functions like gethostbyaddr, gethostbyname (Answer) How do I read or traverse directories within a program? (Answer) How can I detect null references in my program? (Answer) Where is alloca()? (Answer) Purify or other malloc checkers. (Answer) How can I read kernel data through /dev/kmem in a user program? (Answer) How to detect SCO product or version at compile time? (Answer) How to write dialers (Answer) POSIX Timers (Answer) How do I play nice with UUCP locking? (Answer) SCO CC and foo.cc (Answer) Which C compiler delivers the best performance? (Answer) POSIX threads or threads for Unixware and/or OpenServer 5.0.X and ODT 3.0? (Answer) Where to get STL for SCO C++? (Answer) Software packaging and distribution options for OpenServer & earlier releases (Answer) Issues if you develop on 5.0.4 and run on earlier OpenServer (Answer) Issues when compiling on OpenServer, executing on 3.2v4 or earlier (Answer) C++: Using STL in a library and I get link errors from it - Now what? (Answer) C++: I'm building C++ source with the UDK and I get warnings about 'omission of explicit type is nonstandard ("int" assumed)' (Answer) Where to get ANSI/ISO C++ standard library for SCO? (Answer) My existing C++ code doesn't compile under UDK C++! (Answer) Recommended books on UNIX internals (Category) Using FSU Pthreads on SCO systems (Answer) OLD GDS (as on Skunkware) vs. New GCC 2.95.X or GCC 3.0.X (Answer) Building Shared libraries with GCC or SCO cc (Answer) Will UnixWare 2.1 or 7.0 run ibcs/OpenServer binaries? (Answer) Building GCC 2.8.0 on OpenServer results in alloca link failure early during the build. (Answer) I installed GDS or GCC binary kit and nothing works. (Answer) When I run gcc on osr5 I get "cc: installation problem, cannot exec `cpp': No such file or directory" (Answer) Building Perl5.005_03 (Answer) Build DBI with gcc after building perl5.005_03 with SCO cc (Answer) What's the UDK link order for building Motif programs? (Answer) Is UDK C++ thread safe? (Answer) On osr5 when I dlopen a shared library I get "symbol unresolved" errors (Answer) Often used or need Flags when using compilers (Answer) I am having trouble building and running an application with gcc, but someone else is not. (Answer) Assembler overview; differences of "AT&T" vs. "Intel" syntax (Answer) What popular compilers are available? (Answer) Gnu pthreads pth-1.2.2 passes all tests on OSR 5.0.5 (Answer) How do I get BerkeleyDB.3.1 to compile on OpenServer 5.0.X and UnixWare 7.X.X? (Answer) OpenServer 5.0.X, Error as or ld illegal option --b or as: TO FIX: Usage: [-Qyn] [-VTRmn] [-Ydm,dir] [-o outfile] [-t target] file. What is wrong? (Answer) What patches are needed for OpenSSL 0.9.6b for UnixWare or OpenUNIX 8? (Answer) How do I fix Msql-Mysql-modules-1.2216 problem with __deregister_frame_info? (Answer) What is need to compile MySQL on SCO Operating Systems (OS) OpenServer and UnixWare 7.X.x? (Answer) Resources on the SCO web site. (Answer) How do I determine which development System is best for me to use? (Answer) How do I determine what dynamic libraries an application depends upon? (Answer) How do I do Java programming? (Answer) How do I do Java native code (JNI) programming? (Answer) Why are there two threads APIs on UnixWare? Which should I use? (Answer) How do I do XML programming? (Answer) How do I do Web Services (SOAP) programming? (Answer) What J2EE implementations or Java app servers are available? (Answer) About C language and Oracle C API [New Answer in "SCO Development Environments."] (Answer) (Category) SCO comp.unix.sco.programmer FAQ. : (Category) SCO Development Environments. : I have a 3.2v4.2 (or earlier) based system. I don't have a compiler. What are my options? If you really want to be able to compile anything, buy the SCO Development system. That version (and earlier) of SCO UNIX did not come with the needed libraries or headers to allow use of third party compilers. While some people on the net have put together packages to allow you to compile minimal programs, there are still lots of problems in the area of networking and X that remain unresolved. Before you buy the compilers for this old version of the OS, you should probably consider the upgrade to OpenServer. robertlipe@usa.net [Append to This Answer] (Answer) (Category) SCO comp.unix.sco.programmer FAQ. : (Category) SCO Development Environments. : I have a 3.2v4 OS and the SCO 3.2v4 DS. I'm trying to build something and seem to be missing headers and libraries. In that version of the OS, the TCP/IP and NFS development systems were not included in the DS, but were bundled as separate packages. You have to either get the "TCP/IP Development Kit" and the "NFS Develoment" kit or consider the upgrade paths mentioned above. These will give you, for example, libsocket. robertlipe@usa.net There were always bundled DS's (ODT DS) corresponding to the same-time-release Unix, TCP, NFS, etc. DS's. Unfortunately, packaging was such that if you had standalone Unix + TCP, you needed standalone Unix DS, TCP DS. Couldn't use Unix + ODT DS, nor ODT + Unix DS (though the latter might actually have worked, I forget). So if you're trying to buy a DS now, you need to be aware of the many opportunities to buy the wrong thing. From Bela Lubkin, minor editing by robertl robertlipe@usa.net [Append to This Answer] (Answer) (Category) SCO comp.unix.sco.programmer FAQ. : (Category) SCO Development Environments. : I have an OpenServer based system. I don't have a compiler. What are my options? If you're using Free OpenServer and comply with the licensing requirements, install the Free OpenServer compiler from the same CD. You cannot install the Free OpenServer compiler on a commercially licensed OpenServer. SCO's OpenServer Development system is available as a commercially supported product and includes two compilers, debuggers, and tools such as the custom distribution mastering toolkit. For more information, see http://www.sco.com/developer/products.htm. The SCO part number for SCO OpenServer Development System (media and license) is SA105-UX74-5.0. OpenServer includes all the necessary libraries, headers, man pages, and the linker to allow the user of third party develoment systems. One such system is the GNU Development System that's available on the Skunkware CD or the newer version available on Robert Lipe's home page and mirrored on SCO's Web site. This kit includes make, the assemblers, the debuggers, and everything you need for a functional development environment. This kit is available at ftp://ftp.zenez.com/pub/zenez/gcc and has documentation at ftp://ftp.zenez.com/pub/zenez/gcc/sco_ds.html and a little FAQ of its own (that should ultimately be smooshed into this one) at ftp://ftp.zenez.com/pub/zenez/gcc/gds_faq.html . robertlipe@usa.net See also http://www.sco.com/developers/products/devkits.html. jls@sco.com [Append to This Answer] (Answer) (Category) SCO comp.unix.sco.programmer FAQ. : (Category) SCO Development Environments. : I tried to build GCC on OpenServer 5 and it burst into flames. It is time to start using newer version of gcc. Take a look at ftp://ftp2.caldera.com/pub/ This is left for historical purposes. The first FSF release of GCC to include the necessary support to host or target OpenServer was 2.8.0. EGCS has supported OpenServer 5 since the epoch. Anything before this requires a patched version of GCC. Robert Lipe did the port of the GNU tools that appears on the Skunkware '96 CD and on ftp://ftp2.caldera.com/pub/Skunk96 or the old site ftp://ftp.sco.com . It is not a simple matter of 'configure ; make install'. It's a complicated product to build and unless you're planning to slog around in compiler internals, you really want to use the available binary kits. It is time that you start using a newer gcc. Please see ftp://ftp2.caldera.com/pub/skunkware . This is also mirrored on ftp://ftp.sco.com/skunkware . It is required that you install the necessary libraries and headers as described in the documention for that package that is in the "sco_ds.html" file at those URLs. The major contributors of the OpenServer code in GCC (Kean Johnston and Robert Lipe) are active members of the EGCS development team. EGCS is an enhanced GNU compiler system. EGCS contains complete support for OpenServer 5 in both COFF and ELF modes and has received much attention and testing. See http://gcc.gnu.org for more details. GCC does include support for 3.2v4.2 and earlier SCO releases, though it requires the SCO development system be installed. EGCS also includes support for UnixWare 7 and for UDK. robertlipe@usa.net, gerberb@zenez.com GCC 2.8.0, released in 01/98, almost has functioning support for the OpenServer family of products. There is another entry in this FAQ that contains the necessary directions to circumvent the problem. robertlipe@usa.net In recent years, GCC 2.95.3 has packaged and supported for OSR5 (and UW7 as well). No GCC 3.x is as of yet provided by SCO. jls@sco.com [Append to This Answer] (Answer) (Category) SCO comp.unix.sco.programmer FAQ. : (Category) SCO Development Environments. : Issues with GDB on OpenServer and UnixWare. OpenServer 5 support in GDB was sneaked into GDB 4.16 at the last minute and suffered from some problems. You must run configure --target=i486-unknown-sco3.2v5.0.0elf' to get a gdb that recognizes both COFF and ELF. Generally, you'll be better off using a GDB from Skunkware or building a newer version. 4.17 and 4.18 seem to work well. robertlipe@usa.net GDB 4.17 works well on OpenServer. robertlipe@usa.net GDB 4.18 seems to work OK for OpenServer. For UnixWare 7, you must either configure --target=i686-UnixWare7-sysv42mp or apply a minor patch to configure.tgt. robertlipe@usa.net If you are using gdb (or the native debugger) on Openserver and you get warnings of the form "no debugging symbols" on an ELF executable even though you are sure you gave specified -g on the object and executable build lines make sure that *all* the objects ( and libraries) going into the executable are also ELF format. The devsys will make ELF executables if any of the incoming objects are ELF. Any COFF files are converted to ELF format in passing but in the process symbol and debug information is removed from the resulting executable. All COFF objects -> COFF executable with symbol info All ELF objects -> ELF executable with symbol info Mixed ELF/COFF objects -> ELF executable - symbol info stripped. hops@sco.com [Append to This Answer] (Answer) (Category) SCO comp.unix.sco.programmer FAQ. : (Category) SCO Development Environments. : How can I build XENIX or DOS binaries on my OpenServer system? By purchasing the "Xenix/DOS Cross Development Supplement". The SCO part number for the media and license is SA575-UX72-5.0. This gives you the Microsoft based tools that comprised the earlier development systems repackaged to work on OpenServer. robertlipe@usa.net [Append to This Answer] (Answer) (Category) SCO comp.unix.sco.programmer FAQ. : (Category) SCO Development Environments. : Can I generate binaries that run on older sysem on OpenServer? Yes, if you constrain yourself to use only features that existed in the older versions. For example, you can't use mmap(S) (A feature new in OpenServer) and expect it to work on older versions. You should also read the man page for cc(CP) for related issues. There are some bugs in the handling of POSIX terminal handling that affect this ability. #FIXME# more details. robertlipe@usa.net [Append to This Answer] (Answer) (Category) SCO comp.unix.sco.programmer FAQ. : (Category) SCO Development Environments. : Will ELF binaries compiled on OpenServer run on anything else? If compiled with the "UnixWare/OpenServer Development Kit" (UDK), binaries can run on any current SCO operating system. These tools can be hosted on OpenServer, UnixWare 2, or UnixWare 7. Binaries compiled with those tools that use no non-conforming facilities can run on any of these systems. Linux and the BSD familes can run many OpenServer and UnixWare binaries via their ibcs2 support. robertlipe@usa.net [Append to This Answer] (Answer) (Category) SCO comp.unix.sco.programmer FAQ. : (Category) SCO Development Environments. : Link errors on functions like gethostbyaddr, gethostbyname For the unresolved functions, do a 'man functionname'. For example, a 'man gethostbyaddr' shows gethostbyname(SLIB) ******************* ____________________________________________________________________________ gethostbyname, gethostbyaddr, sethostent, endhostent, herror, hstrerror -- get network host entry gethostbyname- get network host entry by name gethostbyaddr- get network host entry by address [ ... ] Syntax ====== cc . . . -lsocket #include <netdb.h> This man page tells us that we must #include <netdb.h> before using these functions and that we must be sure that our cc line links against the socket library by having a '-lsocket' at the end. This same technique should be applied to any link error that you feel the system really does know about but you just don't know where it is. robertlipe@usa.net [Append to This Answer] (Answer) (Category) SCO comp.unix.sco.programmer FAQ. : (Category) SCO Development Environments. : How do I read or traverse directories within a program? ftw(S) will traverse and recurse a path, calling a function of your creation on each object found. If you just want to open a directory and read it, you must use the functions described in directory(S) such as opendir(S) and readdir(S). In OpenServer, you can no longer read directories like a file. robertlipe@usa.net [Append to This Answer] (Answer) (Category) SCO comp.unix.sco.programmer FAQ. : (Category) SCO Development Environments. : How can I detect null references in my program? On OpenServer, there are two kernel global variables of interest in /etc/conf/pack.d/kernel/space.c that may be set. If notice_null_refs is non-zero, a kernel message will be generated when a program attempts to reference the page with a virtual address of zero. If signal_null_refs is non-zero, the kernel will detect zero page references and deliver a signal to the process, killing it and likely leaving a core dump for analysis. TLS594, available at ftp://ftp.sco.com/TLS allows finer control of these actions. robertlipe@usa.net On UnixWare 7, the 'nullptr' command can enable, disable, or trap null pointer references on a per-uid basis. On UW7 before 7.1.0, many system utilities (vi, more, pg) become unstable if nullptr disable is ineffect. robertlipe@usa.net With UW7.1, the MALLOC_CHECKS environment variable can be set to cause page zero to be unreadable. See malloc(3C). This works on a per-process basis. Note that since page zero must first be read to turn off access, when "nullptr disable" has been set, this MALLOC_CHECKS setting will cause a process to die when it first gets into malloc() code. dfp@sco.com Beginning with UnixWare 7.1.3 see also memtool(1) for dealing with null pointers and related memory bug checks. jls@sco.com [Append to This Answer] (Answer) (Category) SCO comp.unix.sco.programmer FAQ. : (Category) SCO Development Environments. : Where is alloca()? Add -lPW to your link line to get alloca() robertlipe@usa.net Note that for UDK C++, alloca() is not supported. (This is because it is incompatible with an efficient exception handling implementation. Note that better alternatives to alloca() exist in C++, such as the vector class in the draft standard library or the Block class in UDK Standard Components.) jls@sco.com If you really need an alloca() to build something and are willing to live with the above and can't find one anywhere else many of the gnu software sources include one. bash-1.14.6/lib/malloc/alloca.c bash-1.14.6/lib/malloclib/alloca.c bash-2.0/lib/malloc/alloca.c diff-2.6/alloca.c diffutils-2.7/alloca.c fileutils-3.16/lib/alloca.o find-3.6/lib/alloca.c findutils-4.1/lib/alloca.c gawk/gawk-3.0.3/alloca.c make-3.75/alloca readline/alloca.c sed-2.05/alloca.c tar-1.12/lib/alloca.c hops@sco.com Heres an asm version (from lxrun) alloca.s .text .globl alloca .align 4 alloca: popl %edx / return address popl %eax / nbytes movl %esp,%ecx subl %eax,%esp / calculate new esp andl $-4,%esp / make sure stack is 4 byte aligned movl %esp,%eax / return pointer to new memory in eax pushl 8(%ecx) / copy saved registers pushl 4(%ecx) pushl 0(%ecx) pushl %ecx / we need to push a fake argument here / since alloca's caller will attempt to / clean up the stack jmp *%edx / return It'll build on Osr5 and UW7 with a simple Makefile rule referring to alloca.o hops@sco.com In the UDK and in UW7, there is an intrinsic version of alloca() built into the compiler. It is enabled via -Kalloca. dfp@sco.com The UDK C++ compiler does now support -Kalloca as well. I think this change was made as of UW 7.1.0 or thereabouts. jls@sco.com [Append to This Answer] (Answer) (Category) SCO comp.unix.sco.programmer FAQ. : (Category) SCO Development Environments. : Purify or other malloc checkers. On Jan 19, 1996, Larry Phelps said: I know of two such products for SCO Unix these: Insure++: Parasoft Corporation 2031 South Myrtle Avenue Monrovia, CA 91016 Phone: (818) 305-0041 Fax: (818) 305-9048 Email: insure@parasoft.com HTTP: http://www.parasoft.com Sentinel: AIB Software Corporation 1145 Herndon Parkway Herndon, Virginia 22070 Phone: (703) 787-7700 Fax: (703) 787-7720 Email: info@aib.com HTTP: http://www.aib.com robertlipe@usa.net checkergcc exists for linux. Could probably be ported to SCO systems. robertlipe@usa.net For C++, the UnixWare 2.x and UDK Standard Components has a memory checking tool called 'fs'. It's not as powerful or transparent as commercial tools such as Purify, but it's better than nothing. jls@sco.com On UnixWare 7 and on UDK, the standard malloc library has instrumentation that can be turned on at runtime. If you export MALLOC_CHECKS, you can control the tests that are performed on the heap. UnixWare 7.1.0 has even more instrumentation and can deliver a SIGSEGV (conveniently trapping you into a debugger) at the bus cycle that delivers the bounds exception. robertlipe@usa.net Electric Fence from Bruce Parens works just fine on OpenServer. I don't really know that it offers anything above the MALLOC_CHECKS tests in the system libraries. robertlipe@usa.net dmalloc (www.dmalloc.com) works fine with OSR5. john@kuwait.net Beginning with UnixWare 7.1.3 there is the "memtool" tool, which does a lot of the memory error detection work that commercial tools like Purify do. See http://uw713doc.sco.com/en/man/html.1/memtool.1.html or the memtool(1) man page on your system. jls@sco.com [Append to This Answer] (Answer) (Category) SCO comp.unix.sco.programmer FAQ. : (Category) SCO Development Environments. : How can I read kernel data through /dev/kmem in a user program? This can be a powerful technique, but it is also horribly non-portable. Kernel data structures can and do change between releases, so your program may break. The basic idea is to call nlist(S) with the table of kernel symbols you wish to examine. nlist will then fill in the addresses of those symbols. You can then open /dev/kmem, use the addresses to lseek(), then issue a read(). On systems that have mmap() available, this is a good use for it. You can look at the sources of programs like u386mon for examples of how to do this. An OpenServer-specific extension is the tab(HW) driver. See that man page and string(HW), and look in /dev/table and /dev/string to see how it works. This only works for a small fixed subset of kernel data. robertlipe@usa.net [Append to This Answer] (Answer) (Category) SCO comp.unix.sco.programmer FAQ. : (Category) SCO Development Environments. : How to detect SCO product or version at compile time? Ordinarily, this is a bad idea. Rather than basing your code on "am I on OpenServer or not?", you're typically more interested in, say, "do I have mmap(S) or not?" Programs like GNU autoconf provide a powerful way to test for features. The SCO provided compilers and the GCC's that are truly OpenServer-aware all provide a manifest "_SCO_DS" that is set to one when targeting SCO OpenServer. robertlipe@usa.net That having been said heres some code that attempts to detect the various SCO platforms upto and including Gemini - It will probably report UDK on Osr5 and UW as Gemini I. #include <stdio.h> main() { #if defined(_SCO_DS) printf("OpenServer\n"); #elif defined(__UNIXWARE__) printf("UnixWare gcc\n"); #elif defined(__USLC__) #if defined( __STDC_VERSION__ ) && __STDC_VERSION__ == 199409 printf("Gemini I cc\n"); #else printf("UnixWare cc\n"); #endif #elif defined(M_UNIX) printf("ODT 3 or earlier\n"); #else printf("Other platform\n"); #endif } hops@sco.com Heres a slight update that understands UW7 CC #include <stdio.h> main() { #if defined(_SCO_DS) printf("OpenServer\n"); #elif defined(__UNIXWARE__) printf("UnixWare gcc\n"); #elif defined(__USLC__) # if defined( __STDC_VERSION__ ) && __STDC_VERSION__ == 199409 printf("Gemini I cc (UW7 and UDK)\n"); # else # if defined(__SCO_VERSION__) printf("Gemini I CC (UW7 and UDK)\n"); # else printf("UnixWare cc\n"); # endif /* SCO_VERSION */ # endif /* STDC_VERSION */ #elif defined(M_UNIX) printf("ODT 3 or earlier\n"); #else printf("Other platform\n"); #endif /* uw7 ccs */ #if defined(__SCO_VERSION__) printf("__SCO_VERSION__ is %ld\n", __SCO_VERSION__); #endif } hops@sco.com [Append to This Answer] (Answer) (Category) SCO comp.unix.sco.programmer FAQ. : (Category) SCO Development Environments. : How to write dialers look at ecu, XC robertlipe@usa.net [Append to This Answer] (Answer) (Category) SCO comp.unix.sco.programmer FAQ. : (Category) SCO Development Environments. : POSIX Timers mkdev suds. They are buggy. Many TAs available on this subject. robertlipe@usa.net [Append to This Answer] (Answer) (Category) SCO comp.unix.sco.programmer FAQ. : (Category) SCO Development Environments. : How do I play nice with UUCP locking? /usr/spool/uucp/LCK.ttyxx, suid uucp, look at xc, ecu, others. Include url. robertlipe@usa.net [Append to This Answer] (Answer) (Category) SCO comp.unix.sco.programmer FAQ. : (Category) SCO Development Environments. : SCO CC and foo.cc Some earlier SCO C++ compilers do not accept some commonly used C++ source file suffixes, such as .cc. In this case the solution is to give the option CC +.cc ... Note that more recent OpenServer CC commands do accept .cc and other common suffixes, as do the UnixWare 2.x and UDK CC commands. jls@sco.com [Append to This Answer] (Answer) (Category) SCO comp.unix.sco.programmer FAQ. : (Category) SCO Development Environments. : Which C compiler delivers the best performance? There are at least four popular compilers on SCO OpenServer and two for UnixWare. 1) /bin/cc is based on the USL cc, not the Microsoft cc that shipped with earlier SCO products. This is actually a respectable compiler. It generates very good code, has a reliable optimizer, and is pretty quick and solid. You can control optimizations with the -O flags and can fine tune the optimizations with the -K options. 2) icc ships with the SCO DS and is based on the Intel Reference Compiler. This compiler can generate amazing code and very good warnings and diagnostics about your source. It can generate Pentium Pro specific optimizations. The price you pay for all this optimization is high in terms of compile time. It can be slow to build your program. 3) gcc is part of the GNU ds. It generates code that is comparable to the quality of the /bin/cc output. The warnings and diagnostics are good. Optimizations can be controlled via the -O, -m, and -f flags. 4) UDK compiler. See the below for more information on the developement kits available for SCO OS's. http://www.sco.com/developers/products/devkits.html All three compilers are ANSI C by default, with options to fall back to K&R. If you're looking for a "magic bullet" from the compiler to speed up your program by an order of magnitude, just by using a different one or by wiggling some compiler switches, don't. Only after you've highly tuned your algorithms and implementation should you even worry about compiler performance. Even then, you should be prepared to stare at the compiler output and run extensive tests before making an informed decision. robertlipe@usa.net, gerberb@zenez.com [Append to This Answer] (Answer) (Category) SCO comp.unix.sco.programmer FAQ. : (Category) SCO Development Environments. : POSIX threads or threads for Unixware and/or OpenServer 5.0.X and ODT 3.0? Unixware has UI (UNIX International) threads. UnixWare 7.0.1 and higher support POSIX (P1003.1c) threads. OpenServer 5.0.X has DCE threads which can be purchased in the US at 800-SCO-UNIX or any authorized SCO UNIX reseller/dealer. This is very expensive. There are two possible GPL treads options available. Both were orginally submitted by ARTURO MONTES <mitosys@colomsat.net.co> Thanks!! There is a pthreads package on Skunkware 97. Custom installable media images for the OpenServer pthreads Skunkware package are at : http://www.sco.com/skunkware/osr5/libraries/pthreads/VOLS.tar This is proven's 1.60 Beta 5 Posix threads implementation ported to SCO OpenSever 5.0.X! The second is FSU threads. http://moss.csc.ncsu.edu/~mueller/pthreads/ A modified to work with OpenServer is available at ftp://www.zenez.com/pub/zenez/prgms/threads.tar.gz You need to use GDS in Skunkware 95 (95q4c). This is necessary because GNU gcc 2.7.2 in Skunkware 97 hasn't GNU as. Currently there is an alpha version of mysql working with FSU threads. Tests are currently ongoing. FSU Threads and Open Server 3.0 or Open Desktop 3.0 FSU pthreads can be compiled with SCO 4.2!! Use a good port of GCC 2.5.X gerberb@zenez.com, robertlipe@usa.net OpenServer 5.0.7 mp3/up3/supp3 has a UDK libthread.so.1 threads library. This can be used to write threaded applications using the UDK development tools. It contains both POSIX and UI API interfaces. This is still a user-space threads library (because OSR5 has no kernel threads); it is a version of the UnixWare 7 libthread, modified to operate under the assumption that the number of available LWPs is always one (which is the case with no kernel threads). Thus, you will see no performance benefit from using this threads library on MP systems. However, it does have better asynch I/O and libc synchronization than other OSR5 third-party user-space libraries (FSU, Pth) and so is recommended for use in UDK-based applications. The Java 1.4.2 implementation on OSR5 mp3/up3/supp3 also uses this new UDK libthread. jls@sco.com [Append to This Answer] (Answer) (Category) SCO comp.unix.sco.programmer FAQ. : (Category) SCO Development Environments. : Where to get STL for SCO C++? Here's the modern answer. Beginning with the UDK 7.1.1b release in Nov 2000, a full and high-quality implementation the entire C++ Standard Library, including all of STL, has been available as part of the SCO UDK product for both UnixWare 7 and OpenServer 5. There is no need to look anywhere else for STL. The sections that follow are for historical interest only, or perhaps for people on very old versions of OSR5 or UW7. jls@sco.com Here's the short answer. STL is not part of the UDK yet, but we're working on it. In the meantime, use the good freeware STL from Silicon Graphics. A packaged version of SGI STL 3.11, adapted for use with the UDK C++ compiler, is on Skunkware at http://www.sco.com/skunkware/devtools/index.htm#stl . See the README.SCO inside there for a description of how to use it. jls@sco.com Here's the long answer. There are four commercial sources for the Standard Template Library: Modena, ( modena@netcom.com ) Rogue Wave ( http://www.roguewave.com ), Dinkumware ( http://www.dinkumware.com ) and ObjectSpace (http://www.objectspace.com/toolkits/ ). These vendors generally sell the STL either on an OEM basis to compiler vendors , or as part of large site licenses. In other words, it's hard to get a single user license, especially for SCO platforms. There is also an up-to-date, public domain version of STL: Silicon Graphics ( http://www.sgi.com/Technology/STL ) This is the best bet for using on SCO platforms. We have a packaged version of it for UDK C++; see the "short answer" above. Note: As of July 1997, the ObjectSpace STL is now also available free for commercial use. However the ObjectSpace download page only offers it in package d form and for only a few platforms. The Solaris 2.5 and Windows 95 versions have been downloaded and unpacked but they are tailored for the compilers on those platforms and efforts to build them show that it would be a lot of work to get them to compile with the UDK C++ compiler (partly because every C++ compiler supports different new features right now, and partly because the auto-configuration tool they use is not included in these distributions). I can't unpack their MIPS/Irix version, which is the only one compiled against an EDG-based compiler, because their install tool is an executable program. ObjectSpace has told me in e-mail that they have no plans to distribute a source code only, configuration-tool-included version of their STL, so I can't be too hopeful of making use of it on SCO platforms In addition, versions 2.6.2 and later of libg++ (the GNU C++ library) include a t least a part of the STL that works with GNU C++. However as of egcs libg++ has been trashed and has been replaced by the SGI version. There is also the original public domain version from Hewlett-Packard that is still available, but it is inferior to the current one from SGI, from which it is based. (Alex Stepanov, the inventor of STL, now works for SGI.) OpenServer and UnixWare 2.x C++ The native OpenServer 5.0 C++ compiler is Cfront-based, and thus will have an impossible time compiling most STLs. At one time, ObjectSpace said that their STL had been specially modified to compile with Cfront, in which case OSR5 C++ should work. Don't know if this is still the case. We have not recently tested any of the STLs against the native UnixWare 2.0 or 2.1 C++ compilers. At one time they all could build, but the STL code may now be assumi ng more advanced compiler features. In both cases, you're *much* better off moving to the UDK, because it supports many more of the advanced template features that STL relies upon and takes advantage of. robertlipe@usa.net, hops@sco.com, jls@sco.com [Append to This Answer] (Answer) (Category) SCO comp.unix.sco.programmer FAQ. : (Category) SCO Development Environments. : Software packaging and distribution options for OpenServer & earlier releases My advice, at this point, is "just say no" to CDMT. The CDMT tools generate a format known as SSO's that can only be read by OpenServer that is an evolutionary dead end. They're not going to be supported in UnixWare 7, and they're not supported by the OS versions prior to OpenServer. Walk away while you can. I would be remiss to not point out the widespread public opinion that SSO's, custom+, cdmt, and the rest of this way of life are, uh, not going to win any popularity contests. There is a TLS on ftp://ftp.sco.com/TLS/tls602.ltr that contains some more information on how to make SSOs if you insist. There is a TLS on ftp://ftp.sco.com/TLS/tls036.ltr that contains the Software Mastering Toolkit (SMT) that lets you build "classic custom" volumes that will install on any SCO Unix release. robertlipe@usa.net, steved@ussinc.com [Append to This Answer] (Answer) (Category) SCO comp.unix.sco.programmer FAQ. : (Category) SCO Development Environments. : Issues if you develop on 5.0.4 and run on earlier OpenServer Bela Lubkin, in the newsgroup, wrote: The OpenServer 5.0.4 development system adds a few function calls which were absent in 5.0.0 and 5.0.2. Most of these were actually intended to be in 5.0.0, but weren't ready in time. Kernel support for all of them is already present in 5.0.0, so programs compiled in 5.0.4 would work on 5.0.0, except that there are potential shared library issues. Of the new functions in 5.0.4, only four of them represent new entry points in the shared libraries. These are fattach(), fdetach(), makecontext(), and mkstemp(). As long as you don't call any of those, I can think of no reason that your programs compiled on 5.0.4 would not work on 5.0.0/5.0.2. If you *do* call any of those functions, your programs will only work if you avoid calling the dynamic shared object versions of the functions. There are three ways to do so: 1. Compile COFF binaries (the default compilation mode). Advantages: if you stick to the right subset of system calls, COFF binaries will work on SCO Unix 3.2v4.2 and earlier; also, statically links in functions which will work on 5.0.0/5.0.2 kernels, but which are not in the shared objects on those systems. Disadvantage: binaries much larger. 2. Compile static ELF binaries (`cc -belf -dn`). Advantage: statically links in functions which will work on 5.0.0/5.0.2 kernels, but which are not in the shared objects on those systems. Disadvantage: binaries much larger. 3. Compile dynamic ELF binaries (`cc -belf`), but statically link in those functions. Technique: $ mkdir /tmp/newlib $ cd /tmp/newlib $ ar xv /usr/lib/libc.a fattach.o fdetach.o makectxt.o mktemp.o $ ar rv libstatic-stuff.a *.o $ mv libstatic-stuff.a /local/lib ... $ cc -belf foo.o bar.o -L/local/lib -lstatic-stuff -o foo Advantage: preserves binary size advantage (and cross-OS- compatibility) of dynamic ELF, while avoiding symbols that won't resolve on 5.0.0/5.0.2. Disadvantage: more effort. >Bela< robertlipe@usa.net [Append to This Answer] (Answer) (Category) SCO comp.unix.sco.programmer FAQ. : (Category) SCO Development Environments. : Issues when compiling on OpenServer, executing on 3.2v4 or earlier This contribution is a conversation between Samuel Liddicott sam@campbellsci.co.uk and Bela Lubkin belal@sco.com Sam>> Am I right in understaning from your message that a program might Sam>> conceivably compile to COFF and fail to run on 3.2v4.2? Even if its all Sam>> staticly linked (however you do it [I'm a delphi man]). If so then Sam>> I need lot of thought. Bela> Your understanding is correct. Bela> System calls are made by calling a generic kernel entry point with a Bela> system call number in a register. Newer system call numbers will be Bela> rejected by the old kernel. There is no compile-time protection against Bela> this. If a program calls one of the newer system call numbers on an Bela> older kernel, it will get a signal (SIGSYS) and die, unless it's Bela> arranged to trap or ignore that signal. Bela> [about readv/writev]: the main place it's likely to matter is in network Bela> programs. writev, in particular, helps ensure that data is sent as a Bela> single network packet instead of many smaller ones. Could be a serious Bela> performance issue if the program thinks it's using a real writev and Bela> tries to take advantage of it. A well-written program will probably Bela> have something like: Bela> #ifdef HAVE_WRITEV Bela> ... code that uses writev Bela> #else Bela> ... code that constructs a buffer and calls write() once Bela> #endif Bela> So it would be better if they didn't find writev() at all. But other Bela> programs may not have such ifdefs, or they may be using writev just for Bela> convenience and wouldn't be harmed by a multi-write implementation. Sam>> As far as fattach or fdir go, if a program "CAN" be compiled for 3.2v4.2 is Sam>> it then presumed that there are compiled time #def's to stop it trying t o Sam>> use those functions? Which I just set (perhaps by hand if a configure Sam>> script got it wrong?) Bela> No, that's the whole point of this discussion. You can freely call Bela> these things and nothing will stop you, except the program will fall on Bela> its face on 3.2v4.2. Sam>> Otherwise, presumably I just wait for the errors to come up at compile Sam>> time, and see why, look for any compile time flags to choose the right Sam>> version, if not plug in my own and send in a patch? Sam>> Finally, have I missed any gotchas, in which it might seem to work, but Sam>> fail? [Presume I have done what you said and compiled a library that has n't Sam>> IDEA: What can I do with the "best no-devsys devsys" as found in Sam>> kuso.shef.ac.uk? Maybe IT has the right libraries, which might WORK and Sam>> STOP a configure script detecting these dodgy calls? Bela> The SCO XENIX/DOS Cross Development Supplement will Bela> work in that respect. It provides a compilation environment which uses Bela> its own libraries, which have none of the new functions. Essentially Bela> the ODT 3.0 libraries, though perhaps some bugs were fixed. Bela> Meanwhile, as I said, here is a script which implements some form of Bela> back-portability ftp://ftp.armory.com/~filbo/makelibv42. robertlipe@usa.net [Append to This Answer] (Answer) (Category) SCO comp.unix.sco.programmer FAQ. : (Category) SCO Development Environments. : C++: Using STL in a library and I get link errors from it - Now what? I'm building a static library and the link errors seem to reference things from the STL that were used in the library - what gives ? One possibility is that the necessary instantiations weren't done when you formed your library. Try using the "CC -Tprelink_objects" command on the .o's that go into the library, before doing the "ar" step that forms its archive. Like this: CC -c a.C b.C c.C CC -Tprelink_objects a.o b.o c.o ar rv libfoo.a a.o b.o c.o I can't be sure this will solve your problem but it's the first thing to try. Diagnostics coming out of STL are legendary for being hard to understand ... hops@sco.com The above CC -Tprelink_objects step is generally necessary when preparing an archive that contains internal template instantiations. There is a known problem in doing this. If multiple archives are being linked against, it is quite possible that you will get multiple definition errors coming from common template instantiations occurring in multiple .o files. We are currently working on a solution for this problem in our next release. For work-arounds, you either have to restructure your source files, or build with CC -Tlocal (which will blow up object sizes significantly). jls@sco.com [Append to This Answer] (Answer) (Category) SCO comp.unix.sco.programmer FAQ. : (Category) SCO Development Environments. : C++: I'm building C++ source with the UDK and I get warnings about 'omission of explicit type is nonstandard ("int" assumed)' The error is that "implicit int" is no longer allowed in C++. Assuming you don't want to fix up the source, but just want to get rid of the diagnostics, here is a technique to suppress the warning messages : 1) Get the compiler to tell you what the error numbers are when diagnostics are displayed using -Wf,--display_error_number CC -c -Wf,--display_error_number whatever.C 2) Modify the build with switches to suppress that diagnostic. -Wf,--diag_suppress -Wf,838 CC -c -Wf,--diag_suppress -Wf,838 -c whatever.C e.g. CC -c -Wf,--display_error_number w.C "w.C", line 1: warning #838-D: omission of explicit type is nonstandard ("int" assumed) CC -c -Wf,--diag_suppress -Wf,838 -c w.C hops@sco.com As of the UW 7.1 UDK, this general technique for selectively suppressing warning messages is documented in the CC man page. jls@sco.com [Append to This Answer] (Answer) (Category) SCO comp.unix.sco.programmer FAQ. : (Category) SCO Development Environments. : Where to get ANSI/ISO C++ standard library for SCO? As of the UDK 7.1.1b release in Nov 2000, a full high-quality threads-safe supported version of the entire ANSI/ISO C++ Standard Library is available as part of the UDK development kit for UnixWare 7 and OpenServer 5. There is no need to look anywhere else. The entries below are for historical interest only or possibly for people using really old versions of UW7 or OSR5. jls@sco.com The UDK C++ compiler does not yet contain a full implementation of the draft ANSI/ISO C++ Standard library. In addition to the Standard Template Library (STL), which is covered by a separate FAQ entry, the new standard library includes: * language support and diagnostic classes * new, templatized versions of the iostreams and complex classes that were in the old de facto AT&T standard library * a number of new facilities, such as strings, locales, and valarrays (for Fortran-wannabe numeric computation). The current SCO UDK C++ fully implements the language support and diagnostic classes (clauses 18 and 19 of the draft standard). The current SCO UDK C++ does not implement the new standard versions of the iostreams and complex classes, but rather still contains the old non-templatized versions, slightly updated for new types such as bool. The current SCO UDK C++ does not implement any of the new facilities. Three commercial STL vendors -- Modena, Rogue Wave, and Dinkumware -- also market full standard library implementations, but on an OEM or large site basis, that is generally not available for SCO platforms. There are free implementations of the following parts of the library. (If these links get out of date, try consulting the comp.std.c++ FAQ at http://reality.sgi.com/employees/austern_mti/std-c++/faq.html#C6 for where to get them from.) string A partial implementation of the string class is available that Modena wrote; it is at http://aw.com/cp/musser-saini-source.html . The file bstring.h in it needs one change to compile under UDK C++: change the #ifndef __BOOL_DEFINED on line 36 to #ifndef _BOOL The ObjectSpace free STL distribution also includes a string implementation, but building it has the same problems as building their STL (see above). valarray A partial implementation of valarray is available that Daveed Vandevoorde wrote; it is at ftp://ftp.cs.rpi.edu/pub/vandevod/Valarray . The Rel2_0Beta2 version there needs one change to compile with the UDK C++ compiler: add the lines #ifdef __USLC__ /* SCO UDK C++ */ # define COMPILER_RECOGNIZED #endif at line 43 of file valplat.h. jls@sco.com EGCS, the Enhanced GNU Compilation System includes the SGI implementation of STL and the necessary modifications to make it work with EGCS. EGCS is available at http://egcs.cygnus.com. robertlipe@usa.net The SGI STL 3.11 is now available for UDK C++ platforms in packaged form on Skunkware, with modifications made that are necessary to compile under UDK C++. In addition to STL, this contains implementations of the string, bitset, and auto_ptr classes from the ANSI/ISO C++ standard library. To get it, go to http://www.sco.com/skunkware/devtools/index.html#stl . jls@sco.com [Append to This Answer] (Answer) (Category) SCO comp.unix.sco.programmer FAQ. : (Category) SCO Development Environments. : My existing C++ code doesn't compile under UDK C++! There are a number of source and binary compatibility issues that arise when moving applications built with SCO OpenServer C++ or SCO UnixWare 2.x C++ to the new SCO UDK C++ compiler. These are discussed in a white paper published in SCO CoreDump Volume 6, located at http://www.sco.com/developer/core6/c++.htm . jls@sco.com [Append to This Answer] (Answer) (Category) SCO comp.unix.sco.programmer FAQ. : (Category) SCO Development Environments. : Recommended books on UNIX internals Most text from Bela Lubkin (belal@sco.com) There are many excellent Unix internals books. Look for: John Lions, " Lions' Commentary on Unix 6th Edition with Source Code", Peer to Peer Communications, 1996 ISBN 1-57398-013-7. This title was long-suppressed by AT&T until SCO bought the rights to System V and therefore became the copyright owner of Sixth Edition as well, and allowed it to be published. More info is at http://www.peer-to-peer.com/catalog/opsrc/lions.html. Maurice J. Bach, "The Design of the UNIX Operating System", Prentice Hall 1986. ISBN 0-13-201799-7. Based on SVR3.0, but still sets the standards for the books on SVR4.0 and BSD. Often used as a textbook. Steve Pate, "Unix Internals: a Practical Approach" Covers SCO OpenServer Release 5 internals. Berny Goodheart & James Cox, "The Magic Garden Explained: The internals of UNIX SystemV Release 4.0", Prentice Hall, 1994 ISBN 0-13-098138-9. Builds on the Bach book but contains information on vnodes, unified VM system, and other things new to SVR4. Leffler, McKusick, Karels, Quarterman, "The Design and Implementation of the 4.3BSD UNIX Operating System", Addison Wesley, 1990, ISBN 0-201-06196-1. This is the famed "Devil Book", named after the cute little demon on the cover named "Chuck". It is to 4.3BSD what Bach is to SVR3. McKusick, Bostic, Karels, Quarterman, "The Design and Implementation of the 4.4BSD Operating System", Addison Wesley, 1996, ISBN 0-201-54979-4. An updated version of the above. Reflects innovations in 4.4BSD. Uresh Vahalia, "UNIX Internals: The New Frontiers", Prentice Hall, 1996, ISBN 0-13-101908-2. Covers many of the new strains of UNIX that are unique including SVR4.2, Solaris, Digital UNIX, 4.4BSD, and Mach. Topics include kernel multithreading, multiprocessor and realtime systems, journaling filesystem, and modern memory management. [Append to This Answer] (Category) (Category) SCO comp.unix.sco.programmer FAQ. : (Category) SCO Development Environments. : Using FSU Pthreads on SCO systems Issues and answers for people using FSU Pthreads on SCO Systems Most of these come from the maintainer of FSU Pthreads for OpenServer, ARTURO MONTES. robertlipe@usa.net Subcategories: Answers in this category: (Answer) Are SCO development libraries reentrant in FSU pthreads? (Answer) Using FSU pthreads my memory grows and grows. What is happening? (Answer) Can I use FSU pthreads as a shared library? (Answer) Which system calls are FSU pthread aware? (Answer) How can I build FSU pthreads on my OpenServer system? (Answer) FSU threads 3.14 can be download on ftp.zenez.com [New Answer in "Using FSU Pthreads on SCO systems"] (Answer) (Category) SCO comp.unix.sco.programmer FAQ. : (Category) SCO Development Environments. : (Category) Using FSU Pthreads on SCO systems : Are SCO development libraries reentrant in FSU pthreads? The answer is almost YES, if SCO claims that its libraries function are reentrant they must be reentrant with FSU pthreads. FSU pthreads on OpenServer tries to use the SCO scheme to make reentrant library. ARTURO MONTES robertlipe@usa.net Can anyone clarify this answer? I can't parse it. robertlipe@usa.net [Append to This Answer] (Answer) (Category) SCO comp.unix.sco.programmer FAQ. : (Category) SCO Development Environments. : (Category) Using FSU Pthreads on SCO systems : Using FSU pthreads my memory grows and grows. What is happening? FSU pthreads use GNU malloc package. You must link your FSU pthreads software with GNU malloc provided with FSU. In other way you will get the previous error. Link with libmalloc.a or with gmalloc.o in FSU pthreads. ARTURO MONTES robertlipe@usa.net [Append to This Answer] (Answer) (Category) SCO comp.unix.sco.programmer FAQ. : (Category) SCO Development Environments. : (Category) Using FSU Pthreads on SCO systems : Can I use FSU pthreads as a shared library? Yes. FSU pthreads come in two flavors: static library and shared library. However, when you use FSU pthreads shared library must to take care of the library order in the command linker line. FSU pthreads use some function in socket library, but FSU make some of them pthread aware. Use always -lgthreads -lsocket -lgthreads, to always use FSU pthreads socket reentrant functions. ARTURO MONTES robertlipe@usa.net [Append to This Answer] (Answer) (Category) SCO comp.unix.sco.programmer FAQ. : (Category) SCO Development Environments. : (Category) Using FSU Pthreads on SCO systems : Which system calls are FSU pthread aware? They are: read, write, getmsg, connect, accept, select and wait system calls. ARTURO MONTES robertlipe@usa.net [Append to This Answer] (Answer) (Category) SCO comp.unix.sco.programmer FAQ. : (Category) SCO Development Environments. : (Category) Using FSU Pthreads on SCO systems : How can I build FSU pthreads on my OpenServer system? Run ./configure in threads/src directory and select the SCO OpenServer option. This command copies Makefile.SCO5 to Makefile. Run make and everything is OK. To install in default /usr/include directory, login as root and cd to thread/src directory, run make install. ARTURO MONTES robertlipe@usa.net [Append to This Answer] (Answer) (Category) SCO comp.unix.sco.programmer FAQ. : (Category) SCO Development Environments. : (Category) Using FSU Pthreads on SCO systems : FSU threads 3.14 can be download on ftp.zenez.com You can download it from ftp.zenez.com with the link below. ftp://ftp.zenez.com/pub/zenez/prgms/FSU-pthreads-3.14.tar.gz gerberb@zenez.com [Append to This Answer] (Answer) (Category) SCO comp.unix.sco.programmer FAQ. : (Category) SCO Development Environments. : OLD GDS (as on Skunkware) vs. New GCC 2.95.X or GCC 3.0.X To find out what GCC and developer tools are available take a look at http://www.sco.com/developers/products/devkits.html The main GCC site is... http://gcc.gnu.org EGCS and GCC merged. SCO now has many Gnu binaries available. Skunkware is available at ftp://ftp2.sco.com/pub/ The Below is for historical purposes. ---------------------OLD---------------------------------------------- ------ Now that GDS looks like it's getting dusty, and there are shiny new releases on ftp://ftp2.caldera.com/pub . Please start using the newer GCC. GCC Advantages relative to GDS GCC contains newer optimizations and can generate hotter code for some input. GCC is a much newer G++ base and much more closely reflects the state of a useful C++ implementation. This below is left for historical purposes. GDS as found on ftp://ftp2.caldera.com/pub/Skunk96 It's prebuilt and custom installable, so anyone can make it go with very little effort. It's self-contained and absolutely works well without the native DS. Assemblers, debuggers, and all that stuff are all there and they just work. It has much air-time - it's on probably thousands of machines around the planet and robertl has almost a dozen postcards to prove it. :-) Disadvantages of GDS relative to either EGCS or GCC. It's based on the 2.7-ish GCC which does have some problems on x86 targets with higher optimization levels. However, many people have compiled many megabytes of code and never encountered any of these problems. It's based on the 2.7-ish GCC which means that it reflects the level of C++ that was implemented in GCC at that time. It certainly does not track the standards as they exist in '98 very well. It's an evolutionary dead end. This package works very well, but the better road to take is to be sure that the newer packages all "just build" from this one rather than trying to make more releases fo this one that track all the component revisions. Robert Lipe, the author of the OpenServer specific parts of GDS, was involved very heavily with the OpenServer specific parts of EGCS. EGCS is available at http://gcc.gnu.com and mirrors. Kean Johnston also joined in the fun and together, they spent about a billion hours each hammering on this code. It, too, has good things and bad things. EGCS Advantages relative to GDS EGCS contains newer optimizations and can generate hotter code for some input. EGCS is a much newer G++ base and much more closely reflects the state of a useful C++ implementation in 1997. See also: http://gcc.gnu.org EGCS Disadvantages relative to GDS Not currently custom-installable. Key members of the Skunkware team are believed to be working on it. Currently requires the SCO assembler. No, getting clever and stealing the assembler out of the GDS will get you nowhere. 5.0.4 allegedly includes the assembler. 5.0.0 and 5.0.2 definitely do not. So if you don't have the SCO DS and you have 5.0.0 or 5.0.2, this is a problem. Non-trivial resources required to bootstrap it. It takes rjlhome (dual-processor P100) about two hours and almost 200Mb to do a full 'make bootstrap'. A full comparison of EGCS vs. GCC can be found at http://gcc.gnu.org/faq.html. I prefer EGCS becuase it's a more open environment, archives of the lists are on-line, and it is a much more integrated package - all the C++ libraries (as well as g77 and objective-c) are there and tested weekly on dozens of targets. I really feel it's a better tested release. I could probably come up with more compelling reasons to further confuse the issue, but I think if I had to optimize the heuristics used, it would be, "If you don't have the SCO DS, stay with the GDS right now." Given a choice between EGCS and GCC, I'd used EGCS. Ultimately, someone will take the time to make EGCS work well with the free assemblers so that a binary distribution of EGCS would be useful for the 5.0.0 and 5.0.2 users. I just haven't had the time to do it, but I can point someone with suitable motivation to a couple of docs I've written on the issues involved. robertlipe@usa.net, gerberb@zenez.com [Append to This Answer] (Answer) (Category) SCO comp.unix.sco.programmer FAQ. : (Category) SCO Development Environments. : Building Shared libraries with GCC or SCO cc [ Answer by Bela and Robertl ] SCO cc GDS EGCS or GCC >= 2.8.0 ============== =============== ============================== Make things to go into .so -belf -KPIC -belf -fpic -fpic Make a .so -belf -G -belf -G -G Use a .so -belf -belf Everything is identical between SCO's cc and GDS except the spelling of the "generate position-independent code" option. GCC 2.8.0 and EGCS 1.0 default to ELF, making the flag to emit ELF unnecessary. robertlipe@usa.net [Append to This Answer] (Answer) (Category) SCO comp.unix.sco.programmer FAQ. : (Category) SCO Development Environments. : Will UnixWare 2.1 or 7.0 run ibcs/OpenServer binaries? The short answer is "yes". UnixWare 2.1.x still has all of the iBCS compatibility support in it and will run OpenServer COFF binaries. You will, however, have to avoid using any of the newer OpenServer features in your program since the level of COFF support that exists in UnixWare 2.1.x is approximately equivalent to SCO ODT 3.0. UnixWare 7 product has a much higher level of compatibility with OpenServer and should be able to run pretty much any OpenServer binary (either COFF or ELF), except ones which rely on some very specific knowledge of OpenServer (eg debuggers, file system repair utilities / defragmenters, or programs which interact directly with the C2 security features and libprot) UnixWare 7 also comes with a development environment (the UDK) which enables you to build ELF binaries which will run on UnixWare 7 *and* on UnixWare 2.1.x *and* OpenServer 5.x (in the latter two cases this requires the installation of a set of comaptibility libraries on the target platform, but these are provided and are freely available). For future development work you may find that the UDK is the best way to go since it gives you compatibility across all three platforms and access to the latest versions of the language tools (C, C++, Java) and debuggers etc. Answer by Michael Davidson in comp.unix.sco.programmer. robertlipe@usa.net Note that UnixWare 7.0.1 removed support for XENIX x.out binaries. These aren't ibcs or OpenServer binaries but are an older standard. robertlipe@usa.net [Append to This Answer] (Answer) (Category) SCO comp.unix.sco.programmer FAQ. : (Category) SCO Development Environments. : Building GCC 2.8.0 on OpenServer results in alloca link failure early during the build. GCC 2.8.0 is a distraction. Use EGCS (http://egcs.cygnus.com) or GCC 2.8.1. robertlipe@usa.net GCC 2.8.0 finally shipped. Yippie! So you grabbed it, saw that OpenServer is finally a supported target, did the configure, typed 'make bootstrap' and watched it die within seconds on the following error: cc -DIN_GCC -DHAVE_CONFIG_H -o cccp cccp.o cexp.o prefix.o \ version.o obstack.o ` case "cc " in "cc") echo "alloca.o" ;; esac ` undefined first referenced symbol in file alloca cccp.o ld fatal: Symbol referencing errors. No output written to cccp gmake: *** [cccp] Error 13 Bummer. There is one solution and one workaround. The problem is in config/i386/x-sco5. Edit the line that looks like it reads "CC = cc" and remove the trailing space after the last lowercase c. After you've done this, you'll need to rerun configure so that it can rebuild all the Makefiles. If you look at the above compilation line more carefully you will see that there is an extra space and that is resulting in alloca.o not being linked into the resulting executable. Alternately, you can just type "CC=/bin/cc make bootstrap" and not have to edit anything. A patch to cure this was submitted to the GCC team on the day that GCC 2.8.0 was released. robertlipe@usa.net [Append to This Answer] (Answer) (Category) SCO comp.unix.sco.programmer FAQ. : (Category) SCO Development Environments. : I installed GDS or GCC binary kit and nothing works. All of the binary distributions for GCC on OpenServer have instructions with them. Reading those instructions really is a pretty good idea. All these kits require the SCO-provided libraries, headers, and related tools. Citing the instructions for GDS that are found at ftp://ftp.zenez.com/pub/zenez/gcc/sco_ds.html : Invoke custom Select "Install New" option from the "Software" menu. Follow the prompts to steer custom toward the original media you used to install OpenServer 5. Select Application Development Libraries and Linker. Install it all. This will give you the libraries, headers, and man pages. robertlipe@usa.net [Append to This Answer] (Answer) (Category) SCO comp.unix.sco.programmer FAQ. : (Category) SCO Development Environments. : When I run gcc on osr5 I get "cc: installation problem, cannot exec `cpp': No such file or directory" You ( or more likely configure) are running gcc with -belf and the gcc version doesn't understand it. (gcc 2.7.2.3) change the Makefile or configure script setup from -b elf to -m elf (or remove it altogether) The default is to use -m elf hops@sco.com, gerberb@zenez.com [Append to This Answer] (Answer) (Category) SCO comp.unix.sco.programmer FAQ. : (Category) SCO Development Environments. : Building Perl5.005_03 Perl 5.005_03 builds cleanly with OSR 5.0.5 cc. Make sure you have installed rs505a, oss497a, and oss499a. I have found you need ftp://ftp.zenez.com/pub/zenez/perl5/h2ph.PL. This file needs to be placed in the utils directory instead of the one there. Then do a perl h2ph.PL and copy the file to /usr/local/bin. I have found that this patch to Config.pm in /usr/local/lib/perl5/5.00503/i386-sco/Config.pm will allow a person to build perl with SCO cc and then use gcc to build all the other modules. This is needed for MySQL. The SCO cc will not work with MySQL. The patch is at ftp://ftp.zenez.com/pub/zenez/perl5/Config.pm.patch . To build Perl5.005_03 on UnixWare 7.1.0 you will need these files ftp://ftp.zenez.com/pub/zenez/perl5/Configure.patch-perl5.005_03 and ftp://ftp.zenez.com/pub/zenez/perl5/svr5.sh. You need to put the svr5.sh file in the hints directory and run patch on Configure. patch < Configure.patch-perl5.005_03 gerberb@zenez.com I found this news comment on the exct problem I am attempting to solve. However, the link to the patch is invalid ftp://ftp.zenez.com/pub/zenez/perl5/h2ph.PL Where else can I obtain this information? Please note temporarily ftp.zenez.com is down. I have had some financial problems. The important files are now on... ftp://ftp.lerctr.org/pub/zenez/ Thanks to Larry Rosenman ler@lerctr.org fpm@flash.net, gerberb@zenez.com [Append to This Answer] (Answer) (Category) SCO comp.unix.sco.programmer FAQ. : (Category) SCO Development Environments. : Build DBI with gcc after building perl5.005_03 with SCO cc If you want to install DBI on OSR 5.0.5 and you built perl with cc you need to edit the Makefile in DBI-xxx and each subdirectory. OLD gcc or SCO cc New CC = cc -belf (gcc -belf -fpic) gcc CCCDLFLAGS = -KPIC -W1,-Bexport CCCDLFLAGS = -fpic CCDLFAGS = -wl,-Bexport CCDLFLAG = LD = ld (gcc -belf -G -fpic) LD = gcc -G -fpic LDFLAGS = -L/usr/local/lib LDFLAGS = -L/usr/local/lib LD = ld (gcc -belf -G -fpic) LD = gcc -G -fpic OPTIMISE = Od OTIMISE = O1 OLD CCCFLAGS = -belf -dy -w0 -U M_XENIX -DPERL_SCO5 -I/usr/local/include NEW CCCFLAGS = -U M_XENIX -DPERL_SCO5 -I/usr/local/include This is because the Perl dynaloader will not load the `DBI' modules if they were compiled with `icc' or `cc'. You can find a patch for DBI-1.06 at http://www.zenez.com/zenez/perl5/DBI.patch or ftp://ftp.zenez.com/pub/zenez/perl5/DBI.patch $ gunzip DBI-1.06.tar.gz $ tar xvf DBI-1.06.tar $ cd DBI-1.06 $ cp /from/download/location/DBI.patch . $ perl Makefile.PL $ patch < DBI.patch $ make $ make test $ make install [Append to This Answer] (Answer) (Category) SCO comp.unix.sco.programmer FAQ. : (Category) SCO Development Environments. : What's the UDK link order for building Motif programs? -lXm -lXt -lXext -lX11 -lSM -lICE -lsocket -lnsl jls@sco.com [Append to This Answer] (Answer) (Category) SCO comp.unix.sco.programmer FAQ. : (Category) SCO Development Environments. : Is UDK C++ thread safe? Yes. In particular: Assuming you compile with CC -Kthread, the generated code from the compiler is thread safe. This includes static local variables with dynamic initialization expressions, which require special guards in this case. Assuming you also link with CC -Kthread, the language support runtime routines are thread safe. This means that things like exception handling, new/delete, and static init/ctor/dtor processing all work correctly in the presence of threads. The C++ Standard Library is also safe for multithreaded applications. This means that: all internal data structures in the library are protected against simultaneous access; simultaneous access to distinct containers is safe; and simultaneous read-only access to a shared container is safe. Simultaneous access to a shared container with at least one thread writing, however, must be protected by the application through the use of mutual exclusion primitives. The older pre-standard iostreams classes, and the old C++ Standard Components classes, both of which are provided for compatibility with existing applications, are not thread-safe. jls@sco.com [Append to This Answer] (Answer) (Category) SCO comp.unix.sco.programmer FAQ. : (Category) SCO Development Environments. : On osr5 when I dlopen a shared library I get "symbol unresolved" errors Assuming no other problems and the symbols complained of are from libc this is normally due to the dll referring to symbols that are provided statically in the linktime libc.so and not in the dynamic (runtime linked) libc.so.1. This works fine for shared libraries that are implicitly loaded ( specified as -l on link line) since the needed static symbols are loaded into the executable . If the dll is explicitly loaded (using dlload) and the symbols haven't been oth erwise referenced in the executable it will fail to resolve the symbol and the dlopen() call will fail with dlerror complaining about symbol resolution. Such static symbols can be identified as symbols that occur in a nm dump of /usr/lib/libc.so and that do not occur in one of /usr/lib/libc.so.1 Workarounds are to ensure that the static symbols are referenced in code in the executable that does the dlopen (in an uncalled dummy routine) or (better) to pull the static objects from /usr/lib/libc.so and explicitly link them into the dll when its generated. This can be seen in building tcl and TclX. The normal builds work fine using th eir own interpreters but if the tclX library is tcl loaded from the tcl interpreter (tclsh) you get a symbol resolution error initially on random (and if thats surmounted then getpriority and then _fsync). heres some partial shell script that makes a tclx dll with the needed static sy mbols # pull .o's containing needed static symbols from libc.so and put in archive FILELIST='random.o getpriority.o v3_fsync.o' ar xv /usr/lib/libc.so $FILELIST ar qv st_syms.a $FILELIST rm -f $FILELIST # make dll with static symbols included cc -G -o libtclx8.1.so tclXbsearch..o tclXchmod..o tclXcmdInit..o \ .... ( rest of .o's elided) .... tclXstring..o tclXsocket..o tclXunixCmds..o tclXutil..o \ ./st_syms.a hops@sco.com [Append to This Answer] (Answer) (Category) SCO comp.unix.sco.programmer FAQ. : (Category) SCO Development Environments. : Often used or need Flags when using compilers If you use OSR 5.0.5 cc/Robert Lipes old gcc or Egcs 1.0.X and gcc 2.95 you may need to edit the Makefile in top and each subdirectory. SCO cc or OLD gcc New (Note it defaults to -melf) CC = cc -belf (gcc -belf -fpic) gcc CCCDLFLAGS = -KPIC -W1,-Bexport CCCDLFLAGS = -fpic CCDLFAGS = -wl,-Bexport CCDLFLAG = LD = ld (gcc -belf -G -fpic) LD = gcc -G -fpic LDFLAGS = -L/usr/local/lib LDFLAGS = -L/usr/local/lib LD = ld (gcc -belf -G -fpic) LD = gcc -G -fpic OPTIMISE = Od OTIMISE = O1 OLD CCCFLAGS = -belf -dy -w0 -U M_XENIX -DPERL_SCO5 -I/usr/local/include NEW CCCFLAGS = -U M_XENIX -DPERL_SCO5 -I/usr/local/include [Append to This Answer] (Answer) (Category) SCO comp.unix.sco.programmer FAQ. : (Category) SCO Development Environments. : I am having trouble building and running an application with gcc, but someone else is not. Support Level Supplements (SLS) can make a difference in the build of gcc. If you are having problems and someone else is not find out the differences in the SLS installed. I personally recommend installing all patches listed on the SCO ftp site. ftp://ftp.sco.com/SLS/README.OSR5.Supplements or ftp://ftp.sco.com/SLS/README.UW7.Supplements After you have added all the patches you want, rebuild and recompile your applications. This has fixed some problems people were having. gerberb@zenez.com [Append to This Answer] (Answer) (Category) SCO comp.unix.sco.programmer FAQ. : (Category) SCO Development Environments. : Assembler overview; differences of "AT&T" vs. "Intel" syntax There is no doc that I know of that describes the assembler syntax used by the assemblers in the modern UNIX products. Mostly, it's understood via a combination of studying what the native compiler emits and UNIX "folklore" about how UNIX assemblers have always worked. The (sad) state of affairs is that people that should be writing assembler code just seem to be able to figure these things out. No, I won't pretend that's a good answer or one that we should be proud of. Darwinism shouldn't be justification for doc failures. You can learn a lot about the assembler syntax by watching how the compiler writes assemblers. Start with a tiny program: int x; main() { x = 0x1234; } Compile it with -S and then look at the resulting .s file. This will show you how to make symbols global, how to separate text and data, how to represent constants, and those three of four other "gotta know" things. Now, to complete the earlier setup, we'll visit history. When Intel or any other CPU vendor releases a family of processors, they almost always have an assembler written for it. The syntax for that assembler is used the examples in their databooks and is therefore a very handy thing to be able to read and possibly write. Now the Intel assembler syntax for IA32 (nee x86) isn't a very pretty thing, but it was definitely the first kid on this block. This is known as "Intel assembler syntax" and is the syntax used by most X86 assemblers including MASM last time I looked. In the mid '80's AT&T decided to flirt with porting UNIX to those 286 and 386 thingies, but decided to contract out some of the work. Assemblers are pretty boring, so that work went to either Microport or Interactive Systems Corp as legend has it. (These were the days when both these companies were known as porting houses and not as shrink-wrapped UNIX vendors.) They saw the Intel syntax and gagged. So they created their own assembler that was similar to some existing UNIX assembler - perhaps it was as much to simplify their port as it was out of "purity" of the language. This became known as "AT&T/386 assembler syntax" and is the syntax used by all the UNIX assemblers for x86 that I know of including the GNU assembler. Other than being completely different, they're quite similar. To move '1' into 32 bit memory address x, one would use: movl $1, x / AT&T syntax - move long, immed 1 -> x / "word" = 16 bits, "long" = 32. or move dword ptr x, $1 / Intel syntx. dbl word ptnr x <- immed 1 / "word" = 16 bits, so "dword" = 32. In AT&T syntax, the name of the opcode (movb, movw, movl) signfies the width of the operands. In Intel syntax, it's the funky qualifier thingies in the middle that achieves the same. There's also the minor difference that the direction is backwards between the two. So, if you find an Intel book on assembler syntax it will do you some good for an AT&T-based assembler but you have to read it in a mirror and remember to always do conversions on every line you read. robertlipe@usa.net [Append to This Answer] (Answer) (Category) SCO comp.unix.sco.programmer FAQ. : (Category) SCO Development Environments. : What popular compilers are available? The OpenServer Development System (a.k.a. "the native development system" or "/bin/cc") is an optional SCO product. It contains a C compiler and a Cfront based C++ compiler. (This means it won't compile modern C++ code.) It provides a complete development environment (make, as, ld, headers, libraries, X11 dev, etc.) This is the kit that must be used for device driver development on OpenServer. It can generate ELF or COFF, defaulting to COFF. GCC is available for free in source form from GNU mirrors (http://egcs.cygnus.com) or in binary form from http://www.sco.com/skunkware. It provides compilers for C, modern C++, Java, Fortran 77, Objective C, and Chill. If you are using OpenServer and don't have the OpenServer Development System installed, you must be sure to install the Linkers and Libraries kit as described in the documentation of the GCC binary kit. On OpenServer, this kit can generate ELF or COFF and defaults to ELF. On UnixWare, it supports ELF only. The UDK is a next-generation development environment that is an optional product from SCO. It includes C and a modern C++ compiler. It can generate binaries that will run on OpenServer, UnixWare 2, and UnixWare 7 when appropriate runtimes are installed. This is the only available devsys for UW7. It emits ELF only which makes it unsuitable for OpenServer device drivers or generating binaries that run on pre-OpenServer SCO OSes such as ODT. GCC can be built from source to provide the "universal binary" features of the UDK following the directions in the source distribution. No known binary kits are available at this time. Doing this does require you have a licensed copy of the UDK. robertlipe@usa.net See also http://www.sco.com/developers/products/devkits.html. jls@sco.com [Append to This Answer] (Answer) (Category) SCO comp.unix.sco.programmer FAQ. : (Category) SCO Development Environments. : Gnu pthreads pth-1.2.2 passes all tests on OSR 5.0.5 Gnu pthreads from ftp://prep.ai.mit.edu/pub/gnu/pth/pth-1.2.2.tar.gz builds and passes all tests cleanly on OSR 5.0.5 gerberb@zenez.com [Append to This Answer] (Answer) (Category) SCO comp.unix.sco.programmer FAQ. : (Category) SCO Development Environments. : How do I get BerkeleyDB.3.1 to compile on OpenServer 5.0.X and UnixWare 7.X.X? You will need autoconf. You can down load the configure.in patch at ftp://ftp.zenez.com/pub/zenez/prgms/BDB-configure.in.patch You will need to patch the configure.in file in the dist directory with this patch. gerberb@zenez.com [Append to This Answer] (Answer) (Category) SCO comp.unix.sco.programmer FAQ. : (Category) SCO Development Environments. : OpenServer 5.0.X, Error as or ld illegal option --b or as: TO FIX: Usage: [-Qyn] [-VTRmn] [-Ydm,dir] [-o outfile] [-t target] file. What is wrong? This is usually caused by using the gnu assembler instead of the SCO assembler. I recommend using the SCO assembler. I rename my gnu as and ld to as.org and ld.org. It is usually found in /usr/local/i?86-pc-sco3.2v5.0.X where ? is 3,4,5,6 and X is your version of SCO Unix. Skunkware gcc x would be 5 or 6. gerberb@zenez.com This is only an issue for OpenServer. The above answer is incorrect for UnixWare and OpenUNIX. It's also why the installation instructions (http://gcc.gnu.org/install/specific.html#ix86-*-sco3.2v5*) say: The native SCO assembler that is provided with the OS at no charge is normally required. If, however, you must be able to use the GNU assembler (perhaps you're compiling code with asms that require GAS syntax) you may configure this package using the flags --with-gnu-as. You must use a recent version of GNU binutils; versions past 2.9.1 seem to work well. In general, the --with-gnu-as option isn't as well tested as the native assembler. robertlipe@usa.net [Append to This Answer] (Answer) (Category) SCO comp.unix.sco.programmer FAQ. : (Category) SCO Development Environments. : What patches are needed for OpenSSL 0.9.6b for UnixWare or OpenUNIX 8? You will need to get and patch your source code with... ftp://ftp.zenez.com/pub/zenez/prgms/openssl-0.9.6b-patches.tar.gz Good Luck, gerberb@zenez.com [Append to This Answer] (Answer) (Category) SCO comp.unix.sco.programmer FAQ. : (Category) SCO Development Environments. : How do I fix Msql-Mysql-modules-1.2216 problem with __deregister_frame_info? This symbol is in the -lgthreads library so after you have done a perl Makefile.PL You need to cd to the mysql and edit the Makefile add -lgthreads to these two below. EXTRALIBS = -L/usr/local/mysql/lib/mysql -lgthreads -lmysqlclient -lm -lz -L/usr/local/gcc-2.95.3/lib/gcc-lib/i386-pc-sco3.2v5.0.6/2.95.3 -lgcc LDLOADLIBS = -L/usr/local/mysql/lib/mysql -lgthreads -lmysqlclient -lm -lz -L/usr/local/gcc-2.95.3/lib/gcc-lib/i386-pc-sco3.2v5.0.6/2.95.3 -lgcc gerberb@zenez.com [Append to This Answer] (Answer) (Category) SCO comp.unix.sco.programmer FAQ. : (Category) SCO Development Environments. : What is need to compile MySQL on SCO Operating Systems (OS) OpenServer and UnixWare 7.X.x? Please take a look at. http://www.zenez.com/B/general/mysql.html OpenServer 5.0.X The public http location of FSU threads is now at http://moss.csc.ncsu.edu/~mueller/pthreads/ The offical download from this for SCO OS's is at ftp://ftp.zenez.com/pub/zenez/prgms/FSU-threads.tar.gz You will need the following 1. FSU threads. 2. gcc-2.95.2 or newer. 3. gnu make-3.79.1 4. perl 5.003_03 or newer. You can get a FSU threads binary from ftp.zenez.com/pub/zenez/prgms/ The important files from ftp.zenez.com are also backed up on ftp://ftp.lerctr.org/pub/zenez Larry Rosenman has important ftp stuff on ftp://ftp.lerctr.org/pub/zenez . I wish to thank them both. gerberb@zenez.com [Append to This Answer] (Answer) (Category) SCO comp.unix.sco.programmer FAQ. : (Category) SCO Development Environments. : Resources on the SCO web site. Please take a look at the SCO website. Because of a virus www.sco.com is at www.thescogroup.com . Developer Page. http://www.sco.com/developers/ http://www.thescogroup.com/developers/ Products for developers. http://www.sco.com/developers/products/devkits.html http://www.thescogroup.com/developers/products/devkits.html Moving to a SCO OS. http://www.sco.com/developers/migration/ http://www.thescogroup.com/developers/migration/ gerberb@zenez.com [Append to This Answer] (Answer) (Category) SCO comp.unix.sco.programmer FAQ. : (Category) SCO Development Environments. : How do I determine which development System is best for me to use? SCO has a web page to assist with this question... http://www.sco.com/developers/products/devkits.html gerberb@zenez.com [Append to This Answer] (Answer) (Category) SCO comp.unix.sco.programmer FAQ. : (Category) SCO Development Environments. : How do I determine what dynamic libraries an application depends upon? The "ldd" command will tell you, assuming that the application's library paths are already set up (either by the way it is built, or because LD_LIBRARY_PATH specifies the paths). But frequently this is not the case, so use the "dump -Lv" command on the application executable and look for "NEEDED" entries. These are the dynamic libraries the executable depends upon. Repeat the command for these libraries, recursively, and you'll find all the dynamic library dependencies. jls@sco.com [Append to This Answer] (Answer) (Category) SCO comp.unix.sco.programmer FAQ. : (Category) SCO Development Environments. : How do I do Java programming? All SCO OpenServer and UnixWare operating systems come with full implementations of the Java 2 Standard Edition Software Development Kit (often referred to as the JDK). See http://www.sco.com/developers/java/products/ for what the latest J2SE version is for your OSR5 or UW7 platform. To find out how to build and run Java applications on SCO UNIX systems, look at /usr/java/ReleaseNotes.html on your system. This will describe any SCO-specific details about Java on that system, and will contain links to the appropriate Sun Java documentation for everything else. If you have installed the right packages, you can also see demos of Java applications on your system in /usr/java/demo/. jls@sco.com [Append to This Answer] (Answer) (Category) SCO comp.unix.sco.programmer FAQ. : (Category) SCO Development Environments. : How do I do Java native code (JNI) programming? Java native code programming means a Java application calling a C or C++ function, or a C or C++ main program invoking a Java virtual machine and application. In general JNI programming should be done using the UDK compilers on both SCO OpenServer and UnixWare. In certain circumstances the GCC compilers may be used on UnixWare, but not OpenServer. Details on all of this are in the SCO Java release notes in /usr/java/ReleaseNotes.html on your system. Be sure to look at the "mk" scripts in /usr/java/demo/native/, as they will show you the right way to build and run JNI code on SCO platforms. jls@sco.com [Append to This Answer] (Answer) (Category) SCO comp.unix.sco.programmer FAQ. : (Category) SCO Development Environments. : Why are there two threads APIs on UnixWare? Which should I use? UnixWare 7 has two threads APIs: SVR4/UI threads and POSIX threads (sometimes also known as pthreads). Both are implemented in UnixWare's libthread threads library and associated system headers. The two have generally similar sets of functionality and generally can interoperate on UnixWare. SVR4/UI was a Unix International (mostly Sun and AT&T/USL) effort at defining a threads API. It has calls of the form thr_create() et al. You will see this API used in some existing UnixWare and Solaris applications. POSIX is a later, more standards-based threads API. It has calls of the form pthread_create() et. al. You will see this API used in most applications today across a broad range of platforms. POSIX threads is definitely the API to use, unless you are working in an existing code base that already uses SVR4/UI threads. jls@sco.com [Append to This Answer] (Answer) (Category) SCO comp.unix.sco.programmer FAQ. : (Category) SCO Development Environments. : How do I do XML programming? SCO OpenServer 5.0.7 supp 3 and UnixWare 7.1.4 now contain full support for XML parsing and building XML-based applications in five languages: C, C++, Java, Perl, and PHP. For UnixWare these XML parsers are provided by various packages in the SCOx components scox-enb and scox-uw package sets. For OpenServer some of these XML parsers are part of the base libraries and some come with the SCOx components. [Append to This Answer] (Answer) (Category) SCO comp.unix.sco.programmer FAQ. : (Category) SCO Development Environments. : How do I do Web Services (SOAP) programming? SCO OpenServer 5.0.7 supp 3 and UnixWare 7.1.4 have support for SOAP- and XML-based Web Services programming in five languages: C, C++, Java, Perl, and PHP. The packages that provide these libraries and tools are contained within the SCOX Components scox-uw package set on UnixWare and the equivalent on OpenServer. If you are interested in web services programming, a good place to start is with the package scoxldemo, which places simple web services client program demos for the five languages into the directory /usr/lib/scox/language_demos/. This will give you a good start on what web services calls look like from each language, and on what commands are needed to build and run them. jls@sco.com [Append to This Answer] (Answer) (Category) SCO comp.unix.sco.programmer FAQ. : (Category) SCO Development Environments. : What J2EE implementations or Java app servers are available? BEA WebLogic Server 8.1 has been certified for (native, not LKP) UnixWare 7.1.4 and Java 1.4.2. UnixWare 7 developers report good success running the open source JBoss J2EE implementation. SCO is working on packaging it, to start with for their Smallfoot (embedded UnixWare) toolkit. Some J2EE implementations have been certified for UnixWare 7 in the past, e.g. Novell Silverstream on UnixWare 7 with LKP. Bear in mind that you dont always need the whole enchilada! For just Java servlets and JSP, use the Tomcat package that comes with both SCO OpenServer 5.0.7 supp 3 and UnixWare 7.1.4. JDBC usually comes from your database vendor. Java-based SOAP/XML Web Services can be run using the Apache SCOx Components included with OpenServer 5.0.7 supp3 and UW 7.1.4. jls@sco.com [Append to This Answer] (Answer) (Category) SCO comp.unix.sco.programmer FAQ. : (Category) SCO Development Environments. : About C language and Oracle C API 我想用Oracle C api 和C 做一个小的系统,如果在sco unix 5.0.7下面可以实现吗, Oracle是否提供了这个C的api接口呢? i have a little english, but use chinese! [Append to This Answer] heruoyong@163.com (Category) (Category) SCO comp.unix.sco.programmer FAQ. : Hardware related programming Questions and answers about device driver and other hardware programming. It is important to remember that robertl is not the FAQ maintainer. YOU are the FAQ maintainer. If you're tired of answering a question or seeing it answered in comp.unix.sco.programmer it is your duty as a good net.citizen to plonk the answer into this FAQ. robertlipe@usa.net Answers in this category: (Answer) How can I write my own device driver for SCO? (Answer) How can I read or set modem signals on a serial port? (Answer) How can I directly read or write the parallel port to use it for input or to control my non-printer devices? (Answer) How can I access to I/O ports or card memory from my program? (Answer) How can I write directly to the console like I do in DOS? (Answer) Can UnixWare device drivers be written in C++? [New Answer in "Hardware related programming"] (Answer) (Category) SCO comp.unix.sco.programmer FAQ. : (Category) Hardware related programming : How can I write my own device driver for SCO? There are several available resources. "Writing UNIX Device Drivers" by George Pajari (Addison Wesley) has some general how-to information and brief coverage of x86 topics. SCO driver book. SCO makes available the Advanced Hardware Developer's Kit This is the definitive guide for SCO-specific topics such as Kernel debuggers, Network drivers, Video drivers, and BTLDs that are not covered in any other place. If you're doing device drivers on or for SCO systems, you need this. To order, visit: http://www3.sco.com/Products/layered/develop/ahdk.htm . You can also use the online version that SCO provides at: http://www2.sco.com:1996/dochome.html . robertlipe@usa.net The documentation, sample drivers, and some test tools are availiable for direct download from http://www.sco.com/hdk . It is the complete AHDK. The SURF kernel monitor is inside the ndtests package. smallshaw@cs.man.ac.uk, robertlipe@usa.net [Append to This Answer] (Answer) (Category) SCO comp.unix.sco.programmer FAQ. : (Category) Hardware related programming : How can I read or set modem signals on a serial port? If your goal is simply to block an open until DCD comes high (i.e, you're writing a dialer) just open the uppercase device like /dev/tty1A or /dev/ttyA01. If your goal is to get hardware flow control to work, look at the man pages for termio(M) and pay attention to the RTSFLOW and CTSFLOW bits. If your goal is to detect when DCD goes away, use the uppercase device as described above and be sure that CLOCAL is clear. This will deliver a SIGHUP to you when DCD drops. If your goal is to be able to wiggle DTR (not RTS), you might look at the description of B0 in termio. In my experience, this is poorly implemented in a number of serial drivers becuase it's poorly specified. For example, it's only implied that DTR gets raise again once a non-zero bit rate is specified. It's similarly unclear what the bitrate actually _is_ while you're in this mode, so if you need to process characters while DTR is low in this mode, it can be somewhat of a crapshoot. If you really, really, want to directly read and write the modem control lines on a serial port, you have two options. Many third party serial boards provide drivers that support the TIOCMGET and TIOCMSET ioctls. Most of the Digi intelligent serial board provide these ioctls. Gert Doering has modified the FAS serial driver to add support for the TIOCMGET and TIOCMSET ioctls. This patch can be found at: ftp://ftp.leo.org/pub/comp/os/unix/networking/mgetty/fas-2.12-TIOCMGET .patch Don't be fooled by the presence of these ioctls in <sys/termio.h> or be tempted to futz with -D_SVID3. They are unsupported in any SCO provided serial driver through and including the OpenServer 5.0.4 products. robertlipe@usa.net [Append to This Answer] (Answer) (Category) SCO comp.unix.sco.programmer FAQ. : (Category) Hardware related programming : How can I directly read or write the parallel port to use it for input or to control my non-printer devices? With the SCO provided drivers through and including OpenServer 5.0.4 family, you cannot directly manipulate or read the bits in the printer port. You can communicate with custom equipment by providing your own device driver. This functionality is believed to exist in the Linux parallel port driver, so you could perhaps port that driver or at least use it as a starting place. robertlipe@usa.net [Append to This Answer] (Answer) (Category) SCO comp.unix.sco.programmer FAQ. : (Category) Hardware related programming : How can I access to I/O ports or card memory from my program? UNIX is about sharing. While it may seem militant that it won't let you (a mere user program) go out and reset the disk controller and reprogram the interrupt controller at will, it's good for you. Honest. There is more information on doing this in this section of the FAQ. However, if you're well disciplined, have only one instance of a program talking to the device, you don't need interrupts, and are willing to accept some responsibility, it is possible to do it from user space. The classic example of this is the X server. On 5.0.0d and later it is possible to mmap() /dev/kmem into user space to talk to memory addressable hardware. To talk to I/O space is a little trickier. You can call V86_IOPL to open up permissions for inb and outb from user space. This can be a little hazardous, as it allows all I/O accesses. Alternately, you can either create your own device driver to do the ins and outs for you or you can use minor numbers 3,4,5 of the major number of the mm driver (the driver for /dev/null, mem, and kmem) to access memory as bytes, halfwords, and words, respectively. Remember that you must re-seek the I/O address each time. If you are going to do this, it is wise to encapsulate this into functions with the usual in/out[bwl] names. This is utterly undocumented and unsupported. robertlipe@usa.net [Append to This Answer] (Answer) (Category) SCO comp.unix.sco.programmer FAQ. : (Category) Hardware related programming : How can I write directly to the console like I do in DOS? This is a degenerate case of the above question. As surely as you write your program to do this, someone will have an incompatible card, will want it to run under X, or will need it from a graphic or text terminal. If your application is text, you should write your app to use curses(S). If it's graphical, coding it for X windows would be a better choice. If you insist on doing it yourself, look for tls015.* ftp://ftp.sco.com/TLS/ . Just please don't do it in code you're going to distribute to others. robertlipe@usa.net [Append to This Answer] (Answer) (Category) SCO comp.unix.sco.programmer FAQ. : (Category) Hardware related programming : Can UnixWare device drivers be written in C++? Yes, albeit with some restrictions and guidelines. See http://uw713doc.sco.com/en/HDK_basics/CTOC-cplus_top.html. jls@sco.com [Append to This Answer] (Category) (Category) SCO comp.unix.sco.programmer FAQ. : Known bugs in SCO Programming Environments. This sections lists known problems and when possible, workarounds for SCO programming environments including SCO's compilers, Visual Tcl, Java, and scripting. It is important to remember that robertl is not the FAQ maintainer. YOU are the FAQ maintainer. If you're tired of answering a question or seeing it answered in comp.unix.sco.programmer it is your duty as a good net.citizen to plonk the answer into this FAQ. robertlipe@usa.net Answers in this category: (Answer) C++ program chokes on time functions (Answer) 3.2v4 /bin/ar mangles archives with full pathnames (Answer) icc and byteorder.h (Answer) I found a bug in the compiler. (Answer) SCO-3.2v4.2 include file fixes for MySQL (Answer) Why doesn't gethostbyname() return the IP address correctly when dynamically linked? (Answer) Patches for gcc-3.3.1 for OpenServer 5.0.x [New Answer in "Known bugs in SCO Programming Environments."] (Answer) (Category) SCO comp.unix.sco.programmer FAQ. : (Category) Known bugs in SCO Programming Environments. : C++ program chokes on time functions Detail the missing extern "C" stuff in headers, how to fix. FIxed in OpenServer 5.0.4. robertlipe@usa.net [Append to This Answer] (Answer) (Category) SCO comp.unix.sco.programmer FAQ. : (Category) Known bugs in SCO Programming Environments. : 3.2v4 /bin/ar mangles archives with full pathnames doctor doctor robertlipe@usa.net [Append to This Answer] (Answer) (Category) SCO comp.unix.sco.programmer FAQ. : (Category) Known bugs in SCO Programming Environments. : icc and byteorder.h edit to test __i386 robertlipe@usa.net [Append to This Answer] (Answer) (Category) SCO comp.unix.sco.programmer FAQ. : (Category) Known bugs in SCO Programming Environments. : I found a bug in the compiler. Yes, there are some. It's far more likely there's an error in your program. describe how to diagnose if it really is or not. robertlipe@usa.net [Append to This Answer] (Answer) (Category) SCO comp.unix.sco.programmer FAQ. : (Category) Known bugs in SCO Programming Environments. : SCO-3.2v4.2 include file fixes for MySQL The fixes I have found that are need for SCO UNIX 3.2v4.2 are available at: ftp://ftp.zenez.com/pub/zenez/prgms/SCO-3.2v4.2-includes.tar.gz Have fun. gerberb@zenez.com [Append to This Answer] (Answer) (Category) SCO comp.unix.sco.programmer FAQ. : (Category) Known bugs in SCO Programming Environments. : Why doesn't gethostbyname() return the IP address correctly when dynamically linked? When gethostbyname() was used in a dynamic library with a dependency on libsocket and libc it failed to return the IP address correctly in hostent->h_addr_list[0], giving 255.255.255.255 instead of the correct address for my machine, frodo, of 192.168.0.130. The library code is in libbad.c and the test driver in t0001.c below. When compiled this way, it failed. cc -w3 -g -c -belf -o t0001dynlib.o t0001.c cc -w3 -g -c -belf -o libbaddynlib.o libbad.c cc -G -belf -o libbaddynlib.so libbaddynlib.o -lsocket -lc LD_RUN_PATH=$PWD cc -belf -o asdynlib-fail t0001dynlib.o -L$PWD -lbaddynlib When compiled this way (without the -lsocket/-l on the dynamic library line it) it worked. cc -w3 -g -c -belf -o t0001dynlib.o t0001.c cc -w3 -g -c -belf -o libbaddynlib.o libbad.c cc -G -belf -o libbaddynlib.so libbaddynlib.o LD_RUN_PATH=$PWD cc -belf -o asdynlib-works t0001dynlib.o -L$PWD -lbaddynlib -l socket -lc I had this problem on OpenServer 5.0.6a with version 5.1.2A of the linker. To fix I applied oss646a and that seemed to fix everything. Presumably the same fix will work for 5.0.5a, although I couldn't test the original working version as that would not compile without -lsocket -lc for the dynamic library. os001:jonm $ cat libbad.c #include <netdb.h> struct hostent *my_gethostbyname(char *name) { struct hostent *my_hostent; my_hostent = gethostbyname(name); return my_hostent; } os001:jonm $ cat t0001.c #include <sys/socket.h> #include <netinet/in.h> #include <arpa/inet.h> #include <netdb.h> int main(void) { int errs = 0; struct hostent *h; struct hostent *my_gethostbyname(char*); h = my_gethostbyname("localhost"); if (h == NULL) { fprintf(stderr, "localhost FAIL - gethostbyname\n"); errs++; } else if (h->h_addr[0] == -1 && h->h_addr[1] == -1 && h->h_addr[2] == -1 && h->h_addr[3] == -1) { fprintf(stderr, "localhost FAIL - IP address\n"); errs++; } else { fprintf(stderr, "localhost OK - %d.%d.%d.%d\n", h->h_addr[0], h->h_addr[1], h->h_addr[2], h->h_addr[3]); } h = my_gethostbyname("frodo"); if (h == NULL) { fprintf(stderr, "frodo FAIL - gethostbyname\n"); errs++; } else if (h->h_addr[0] == -1 && h->h_addr[1] == -1 && h->h_addr[2] == -1 && h->h_addr[3] == -1) { fprintf(stderr, "frodo FAIL - IP address\n"); errs++; } else { fprintf(stderr, "frodo OK - %s\n", inet_ntoa(*(struct in_addr * )h->h_addr)); } return (errs != 0); } jonm@alchemetrics.co.uk cobrakings@263.net [Append to This Answer] (Answer) (Category) SCO comp.unix.sco.programmer FAQ. : (Category) Known bugs in SCO Programming Environments. : Patches for gcc-3.3.1 for OpenServer 5.0.x Thanks to Kean Here is what you need... Download gcc from ftp.gnu.org ftp://ftp.gnu.org/gnu/gcc/gcc-3.3.1.tar.gz You need to download these patches and patch gcc-3.3.1 ftp://ftp.zenez.com/pub/zenez/prgms/331patch.bz2 bunzip2 331patch.gz2 apply patch In the gcc-3.3.1 directory I make an "osr5" directory. cd into that and then execute: CC=gcc CFLAGS=-O2 CXX=g++ CXXFLAGS=-O2 NM=gnm ../configure \ --with-gnu-as \ --with-as=/usr/gnu/bin/as \ --disable-shared \ --with-system-zlib \ --enable-multilib \ --host=i586-pc-sco3.2v5.0 \ --build=i586-pc-sco3.2v5.0 This assumes you have my latest GNU Development Tools package installed and that /usr/gnu/bin appears on your PATH *before* /usr/local/bin. This passes the vast majority of its internal DejaGNU tests. Its about the best shape GCC has been in on OSR5 in a long while. But there are problems, especially with C++. The way they handle template instantiation is awkward. You may find you need to link C++ programs and shared libraries with -Wl,-z -Wl,multidefs. The real solution is for us to change our link editor to recognize these .gnu.linkonce sections and obey them, or to get the GNU link editor working on OSR5, something I am fairly close to getting right but it is still a way off. But at least this gets you most of the way there. I am curious to know how this works out for you. This set of patches adds full support for gjc, the GNU Java Compiler. Kean. gerberb@zenez.com [Append to This Answer] (Category) (Category) SCO comp.unix.sco.programmer FAQ. : Third-party Languages and Development Tools for SCO Platforms These answers list third-party language and development tools that are available on various SCO platforms. This information comes from vendors' web pages, product sheets, etc. Please update the information if you have more current knowledge. Usually, platforms later than those listed will also work. So if you see a product listed for OpenServer 5.0.4 or UnixWare 7, you can likely assume the product runs on OpenServer 5.0.5 or UnixWare 7.1 as well. Sometimes vendors have listings for a generic "SVR4 Intel", which means it will usually run on UnixWare 2 or UnixWare 7, or less commonly, for a generic "SVR3 Intel", which means it will probably run on SCO UNIX or OpenServer. Finally, when in doubt, ask the vendor. gerberb@zenez.com, jls@sco.com Subcategories: Answers in this category: (Answer) What COBOL compilers are available for SCO? (Answer) What Fortran compilers are available for SCO? (Answer) What Ada compilers are available for SCO? (Answer) What about BASIC, Pascal, or Modula-2 for SCO? (Answer) What CORBA implementations are available for SCO? (Answer) What 4GLs are available for SCO? (Answer) What IDEs are available for SCO? (Answer) SCOTruss by Troy DeJongh and Eric Sybesma (Answer) Comeau C/C++ supports Standard C++for SCO (Caldera) OS's [New Answer in "Third-party Languages and Development Tools for SCO Platforms"] (Answer) (Category) SCO comp.unix.sco.programmer FAQ. : (Category) Third-party Languages and Development Tools for SCO Platforms : What COBOL compilers are available for SCO? Micro Focus v4.1 (Object COBOL); v4 (COBOL 85) OSR5.0.x, UW 2.1.2, UW 7 (with ptf7013), SCO UNIX http://www.microfocus.com ACUCOBOL v4.1.0CL (COBOL 85) OSR5.0.x, UW 2.0, SCO UNIX, Xenix http://www.acucobol.com Liant RM/COBOL 85 v6.6.1 "on SCO UNIX" http://www.liant.com jls@sco.com Customers have also reported that Fujistu COBOL, formerly for PCs, is now avail able for UNIX (presumably including SCO) as well. jls@sco.com [Append to This Answer] (Answer) (Category) SCO comp.unix.sco.programmer FAQ. : (Category) Third-party Languages and Development Tools for SCO Platforms : What Fortran compilers are available for SCO? Edinburgh Portable Compilers (EPC) Fortran 90 UW 2.x http://www.epc.com g77 (GNU Fortran 77) OSR5, UW7 from Skunkware egcs distribution http://www.sco.com/skunkware , http://egcs.cygnus.com Microway NDP Fortran 77 x86 UNIX V.3 and V.4 http://www.microway.com jls@sco.com [Append to This Answer] (Answer) (Category) SCO comp.unix.sco.programmer FAQ. : (Category) Third-party Languages and Development Tools for SCO Platforms : What Ada compilers are available for SCO? Ada 95 Janus/A95 v. 3.1.0 for SCO UNIX 3.2 GNU-based GNAT ( http://www.gnat.com ) has a UnixWare 7 port Ada 83 Alsys for OSR5, SVR4 Intel, SCO UNIX 3.2 IntegrAda, Janus/Ada, VADS, Green Hills for SCO UNIX 3.2 http://www.adaresource.org jls@sco.com [Append to This Answer] (Answer) (Category) SCO comp.unix.sco.programmer FAQ. : (Category) Third-party Languages and Development Tools for SCO Platforms : What about BASIC, Pascal, or Modula-2 for SCO? BASIC Thoroughbred Software Business BASIC http://www.tbred.com Pascal EPC Pascal for UW 2.x; http://www.epc.com MicroWay NDP Pascal for x86 UNIX V.3, V.4; http://www.microway.com Modula-2 EPC Modula-2 for UW 2.x; http://www.epc.com jls@sco.com Bbx4 and /or Visual Pro5, both upwards compatible to Thouroughbred's SMC basic ( (and has conversion tools for SMC) see http:/www.basis.com A.Sas@katwijkfarma.nl CET Basic. Info at http://www.phaseonesystems.com jmdubois@free.fr [Append to This Answer] (Answer) (Category) SCO comp.unix.sco.programmer FAQ. : (Category) Third-party Languages and Development Tools for SCO Platforms : What CORBA implementations are available for SCO? First the commercial ones.... Iona Orbix (C++) Orbix v. 2.3c on UW 7.0.1, UW 2.1.2 Orbix v. 3 not yet in QA process for SCO platforms http://www.iona.com Iona OrbixWeb (Java) OrbixWeb v. 3.1 on JDK 1.1.3u Later versions on JDK 1.1.7A under test PeerLogic (ex-ICL) DAIS on UW 7 (the only ORB officially released for UW 7) http://www.peerlogic.com/products/dais/f_dais.htm also DAIS J2 for JDK 1.1.x Inprise VisiBroker, as part of UW7 Netscape Enterprise ORB is exposed via IIOP interface Inprise VisiBroker for Java on JDK 1.1.5 or higher http://www.inprise.com/visibroker Expersoft CORBAplus, Java Edition on JDK 1.1.x http://www.expersoft.com Now some freeware ones.... OmniORB2 v. 2.5.0 on Skunkware 98 for OSR5 we are trying to get better threading with v. 2.7.0 Chorus COOL-ORB once on OSR5, now discontinued? MICO ILU ftp://ftp.parc.xerox.com/pub/ilu Corbus http://www.bbn.com/products/dpom/corbus.htm Electra http://www.olsen.ch/~maffeis/electra.html jls@sco.com [Append to This Answer] (Answer) (Category) SCO comp.unix.sco.programmer FAQ. : (Category) Third-party Languages and Development Tools for SCO Platforms : What 4GLs are available for SCO? Oracle Developer 2000 v. 2.1 UW7, UW 2.1.2 http://www.oracle.com Informix Dynamic 4GL v. 2.10 UW7, OSR5; earlier version OSR5, UW 2.1.2 http://www.informix.com Unify ACELL IDS 4GL OSR5.0.4; earlier version UW 2.1, SCO UNIX http://www.unify.com Recital 8.0 Unix Developer OSR5.0.0, UW 2.1.1, SCO UNIX 3.2v4.2 http://www.recital.com; single-user non-commercial is free jls@sco.com I've been told by customers that the Informix 4GL also runs on OSR5 and Xenix. Customers have used the Ingres 4GL, as well as ICL DMS. The Sybase 4GL is also thought to work on OSR5. In general, if a database itself is supported on a SCO platform, then it's likely (though not necessarily certain) an acommpanying 4GL does as well. jls@sco.com [Append to This Answer] (Answer) (Category) SCO comp.unix.sco.programmer FAQ. : (Category) Third-party Languages and Development Tools for SCO Platforms : What IDEs are available for SCO? TakeFive SNiFF+ full-featured, support C/C++/Java IDE for UW7 http://www.takefive.com ftp://ftp.takefive.com/pub/SNiFF/patches/3.0.2 for UDK debugger integra tion Sun Java WorkShop (for programmers), Sun Java Studio (for power end-users) through 1998, both in UDK (UW7, OSR5, UW2) new version in 1999 becoming "open source" -- will become available on Skunkware. Freeware alternatives (working on getting into Skunkware): Code Crusader, http://www.cco.caltech.edu/~jafl/jcc/ , inspired by Metr owerks RHIDE, http://www.tu-chemnitz.de/~sho/rho/rhide-1.4/rhide.html , inspir ed by Borland xwpe-alpha, http://www.rpi.edu/~payned/xwpe/ , inspired by Borland gIDE, http://gide.pn.org , based on freeware GTK+ toolkit more development resources at http://tx.us.mirrors.freshmeat.net/appind ex/development/ jls@sco.com [Append to This Answer] (Answer) (Category) SCO comp.unix.sco.programmer FAQ. : (Category) Third-party Languages and Development Tools for SCO Platforms : SCOTruss by Troy DeJongh and Eric Sybesma Eric Sybesma and Troy DeJongh have written scotruss a program that gives truss-like capablilites for the SCO Operating System. The latest version can be found at http://pobox.com/~troyd/ http://pobox.com/~troyd/scotruss.tar.gz gzip'ed http://pobox.com/~troyd/scotruss.tar.Z compress'ed Troy DeJongh can be reached via email at troyd@pobox.com gerberb@zenez.com [Append to This Answer] (Answer) (Category) SCO comp.unix.sco.programmer FAQ. : (Category) Third-party Languages and Development Tools for SCO Platforms : Comeau C/C++ supports Standard C++for SCO (Caldera) OS's Comeau C/C++ supports Standard C++, Standard C90, and Standard C99, and is available for the different SCO operating systems. For more info check http://www.comeaucomputing.com Comeau Computing <comeau@comeaucomputing.com> gerberb@zenez.com [Append to This Answer] (Category) (Category) SCO comp.unix.sco.programmer FAQ. : Misc for OpenServer 5.0.X and Unixware 7.x.x / OpenUNIX 8.x.x Information to help with OpenServer, UnixWare and OpenUNIX. gerberb@zenez.com Subcategories: Answers in this category: (Answer) Latest Versions of SCO OS's are OpenServer is 5.0.7, UnixWare is 7.1.4, OpenUNIX 8.0.0 (UnixWare 7.1.2|) and SCO Linux 4.0 (Answer) Perl5.005_03 patches and additions for UnixWare 7.1.0 (Answer) Patches for Roxen Challenger 1.3.X (Answer) Where can I find information on migration from OpenServer to UnixWare or OpenUNIX ? (Answer) To compile MySQL-3.23.56 on UnixWare 7.1.x or OpenUNIX 8.0.0 you will need these patches. (Answer) Openssl-0.9.6i patch for OpenServer 5.0.X. (Answer) How do I get openssl-.0.9.6x to compile and make shared libraries on OpenServer 5.0.X, UnixWare 7.1.X and OpenUNIX 8.0.0? (Answer) How do I make test for a SCO OS for preprocessor in ..., code specific to SCO Operating Systems. (Answer) How can I get cvs-1.11.5 to compile? (Answer) What is needed for MySQL-4.0.X to compile on OpenServer 5.0.X? (Answer) How do I get gnupg to compile for SCO OS's? [New Answer in "Misc for OpenServer 5.0.X and Unixware 7.x.x / OpenUNIX 8.x.x"] (Answer) (Category) SCO comp.unix.sco.programmer FAQ. : (Category) Misc for OpenServer 5.0.X and Unixware 7.x.x / OpenUNIX 8.x.x : Latest Versions of SCO OS's are OpenServer is 5.0.7, UnixWare is 7.1.4, OpenUNIX 8.0.0 (UnixWare 7.1.2|) and SCO Linux 4.0 The latest versions just released by SCO are OpenServer 5.0.7, UnixWare Version 7.1.4. For more information check http://www.sco.com SCO has gone back to the name UnixWare. OpenUNIX 8.0.0 was UnixWARE 7.1.2. gerber@zenez.com, gerberb@zenez.com [Append to This Answer] (Answer) (Category) SCO comp.unix.sco.programmer FAQ. : (Category) Misc for OpenServer 5.0.X and Unixware 7.x.x / OpenUNIX 8.x.x : Perl5.005_03 patches and additions for UnixWare 7.1.0 The patches for this are available at ftp://www.zenez.com/pub/zenez/prgms/perl5.005_03-patches/ There are three files. Configure.patch to patch Configure in the top level of the distribution. sco.sh.patch to patch hints/sco.sh svr5.sh A new file that goes in hints to allow building with cc or gcc with or with out threads. To get threads with gcc you must use gcc-2.95.1 or newer. gerberb@zenez.com [Append to This Answer] (Answer) (Category) SCO comp.unix.sco.programmer FAQ. : (Category) Misc for OpenServer 5.0.X and Unixware 7.x.x / OpenUNIX 8.x.x : Patches for Roxen Challenger 1.3.X The following are the patches required to get roxen Challenger 1.3.x through the latest 1.3.122 to compile and work. These are for configure.in ftp://ftp.zenez.com/pub/zenez/prgms/roxen_1.3.x.patches.tar.gz To installed them cd to roxen directroy. Copy files to the roxen directory and gunzip them. tar xf roxen.1.3.x.patches.tar run autoconf in the top level and in pike/0.6/src directrories. Make sure your OSR 5.0.X kernel NOFILES is set to 2048 or more and your UnixWare 7.1.X kernel HFNOLIM is set to 4096. gerberb@zenez.com [Append to This Answer] (Answer) (Category) SCO comp.unix.sco.programmer FAQ. : (Category) Misc for OpenServer 5.0.X and Unixware 7.x.x / OpenUNIX 8.x.x : Where can I find information on migration from OpenServer to UnixWare or OpenUNIX ? SCO has removed the portal. There is information on. http://www.sco.com/ Please search the SCO site. gerberb@zenez.com [Append to This Answer] (Answer) (Category) SCO comp.unix.sco.programmer FAQ. : (Category) Misc for OpenServer 5.0.X and Unixware 7.x.x / OpenUNIX 8.x.x : To compile MySQL-3.23.56 on UnixWare 7.1.x or OpenUNIX 8.0.0 you will need these patches. The patches are on ftp.zenez.com in pub/zenez/prgms/mysql-3.23.56-patches-ou8. ftp://ftp.zenez.com/pub/zenez/prgms/mysql-3.23.56-patches-ou8/ These are not needed in newer versions of MySQL. Like MySQL-4.X.X or MySQL-5.X.X. gerberb@zenez.com [Append to This Answer] (Answer) (Category) SCO comp.unix.sco.programmer FAQ. : (Category) Misc for OpenServer 5.0.X and Unixware 7.x.x / OpenUNIX 8.x.x : Openssl-0.9.6i patch for OpenServer 5.0.X. The following is a patch that helps performance on OpenServer 5.0.x. It was provided by Kean Johnston <jkj@sco.com> The patch is available at ftp://ftp.zenez.com/pub/zenez/prgms/openssl-0.9.6i-osr5.patches.gz Good Luck, <jkj@sco.com> gerberb@zenez.com [Append to This Answer] (Answer) (Category) SCO comp.unix.sco.programmer FAQ. : (Category) Misc for OpenServer 5.0.X and Unixware 7.x.x / OpenUNIX 8.x.x : How do I get openssl-.0.9.6x to compile and make shared libraries on OpenServer 5.0.X, UnixWare 7.1.X and OpenUNIX 8.0.0? You run Configure with one of the following options. UnixWare 7 unixware-7 unixware-7-gcc unixware-7-pentium unixware-7-pentium_pro unixware-7-shared unixware-7-gcc-shared $ ./Configure unixware-7-shared $ make $ make test # make install Then I created and installed the shared libraries with... $ shlib/svr5-shared.sh $ shlib/svr5-shared-installed.sh Updated shlib files can be had at... ftp://ftp.zenez.com/pub/zenez/prgms/svr5-shared.sh ftp://ftp.zenez.com/pub/zenez/prgms/svr5-shared-installed ftp://ftp.zenez.com/pub/zenez/prgms/svr5-shared-gcc.sh OpenUNIX OpenUNIX-8 OpenUNIX-8-gcc OpenUNIX-8-pentium OpenUNIX-8-pentium_pro OpenUNIX-8-shared OpenUNIX-8-gcc-shared I used Configure OpenUNIX-8-shared.... $ ./Configure OpenUNIX-8-shared $ make $ make test # make install Then I created and installed the shared libraries with... $ shlib/svr5-shared.sh $ shlib/svr5-shared-installed.sh Updated shlib files can be had at... ftp://ftp.zenez.com/pub/zenez/prgms/svr5-shared.sh ftp://ftp.zenez.com/pub/zenez/prgms/svr5-shared-installed ftp://ftp.zenez.com/pub/zenez/prgms/svr5-shared-gcc.sh OpenServer 5.0.X sco5-cc sco5-cc-pentium sco5-cc-shared sco5-gcc sco5-gcc-shared $ ./Configure sco5-gcc-shared $ make $ make test # make install Then I created and installed the shared libraries with... $ shlib/svr5-shared.sh $ shlib/svr5-shared-installed.sh Updated shlib files can be had at... ftp://ftp.zenez.com/pub/zenez/prgms/sco5-shared.sh ftp://ftp.zenez.com/pub/zenez/prgms/sco5-shared-installed ftp://ftp.zenez.com/pub/zenez/prgms/sco5-shared-gcc.sh Openssl-0.9.7 shlib files are available at ftp://ftp.zenez.com/pub/zenez/prgms/openssl-0.9.7-shlib/ Good Luck, gerberb@zenez.com [Append to This Answer] (Answer) (Category) SCO comp.unix.sco.programmer FAQ. : (Category) Misc for OpenServer 5.0.X and Unixware 7.x.x / OpenUNIX 8.x.x : How do I make test for a SCO OS for preprocessor in ..., code specific to SCO Operating Systems. I use the following and put the specific defines needed between the if and endif I have found that is only works with the SCO native compilers. # if defined(__SCO_VERSION__) # endif This seems to work with all compilers. # if defined(_SCO_DS) # endif gerberb@zenez.com [Append to This Answer] (Answer) (Category) SCO comp.unix.sco.programmer FAQ. : (Category) Misc for OpenServer 5.0.X and Unixware 7.x.x / OpenUNIX 8.x.x : How can I get cvs-1.11.5 to compile? You need the following patches. ftp://ftp.zenez.com/pub/zenez/prgms/INSTALL.patch ftp://ftp.zenez.com/pub/zenez/prgms/diff-system.h.patch ftp://ftp.zenez.com/pub/zenez/prgms/lib-system.h.patch ftp://ftp.zenez.com/pub/zenez/prgms/src-buffer.c.patch ftp://ftp.zenez.com/pub/zenez/prgms/src-buffer.h.patch These file need to be changed in the diff, lib and src directories. gerberb@zenez.com [Append to This Answer] (Answer) (Category) SCO comp.unix.sco.programmer FAQ. : (Category) Misc for OpenServer 5.0.X and Unixware 7.x.x / OpenUNIX 8.x.x : What is needed for MySQL-4.0.X to compile on OpenServer 5.0.X? You need the latest version of FSU-threads. This version is no longer needed. MySQL-4.0.20 will compile and work with the orignal FSUtreads 3.14. There is currently a test version of FSU-threads-3.14a.tar.gz on ftp://ftp.zenez.com/pub/zenez/prgms/FSU-threads-3.14a.tar.gz The above is needed for MySQL-4.0.17, and MySQL-4.0.18. Please use ftp://ftp.zenez.com/pub/zenez/prgms/FSU-threads.tar.gz gerberb@zenez.com [Append to This Answer] (Answer) (Category) SCO comp.unix.sco.programmer FAQ. : (Category) Misc for OpenServer 5.0.X and Unixware 7.x.x / OpenUNIX 8.x.x : How do I get gnupg to compile for SCO OS's? GnuPG use asm unless it is disabled. To get gnuPG to compile try using. ./configure --disable-asm gerberb@zenez.com [Append to This Answer] (Category) (Category) SCO comp.unix.sco.programmer FAQ. : How to Find FAQ Please look for the FAQ on http://www.zenez.com/cgi-bin/scoprogfaq/faq gerber@zenez.com, gerberb@zenez.com Subcategories: Answers in this category: (Answer) Also look on http://www.zenez.com/cgi-bin/scoprogfaq/faq [New Answer in "How to Find FAQ"] (Answer) (Category) SCO comp.unix.sco.programmer FAQ. : (Category) How to Find FAQ : Also look on http://www.zenez.com/cgi-bin/scoprogfaq/faq [Append to This Answer] This document is: http://www.zenez.com/cgi-bin/scoprogfaq/faq?file=1 [Search] [Appearance] [Show Top Category Only] This is a Faq-O-Matic 2.721. -- Boyd Gerber <gerberb@zenez.com> 801 849-0213 ZENEZ 1042 East Fort Union #135, Midvale Utah 84047