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Subject: [Reposted due to Enlow UCE cancel]: Speed Limits: States' Attitudes (9/6/97) - FAQ Version

This article was archived around: 19 Oct 1997 07:00:05 GMT

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Archive-name: autos/state-speed-limits Posting-Frequency: Every other thursday Last-modified: 9/6/1997 (M/D/Y) Last-posted: 7/3/1997 URL: http://sunsite.unc.edu/rdu/sl-attud/index.html
This is the FAQ Version of my States' Attitudes Towards Speed Limits lists at my Reasonable Drivers Unanimous site (http://sunsite.unc.edu/rdu/). It is posted biweekly to several traffic/driving related newsgroups and is sent out at the same time to all members of the Sl-Attud mailing list. If you would like to join the list sent me a note at kevina@clark.net. It consisted chiefly of two parts a Summary Chart and a Detailed List. The Summary Chart shows the current and proposed speed limits for the various states. It has just recently been changes to make it a lot less confusing. Unfortunately some information was lost in the process. The Original Summary Chart is available near the end of this document for those who like it better. The News Summary gives a gives a quick overview of what is happening in the states in terms of speed limits. Only states with something happening within the last 6 months are listed. This information is also included in the Detailed List but is separated for those who do not wish to go through it all. The Detailed List shows a detailed breakdown of every states attitude toward speed limits in plain English. This is the place were you can find the full story of any possible increases. If you wish to have access to the links presented see the html version. The Original Summary Chart is the original confusing Chart. It is designed to show the general attitude of states toward speed limits and what the current post-NMSL speed limit is. I am trying to keep this information as up-to-date as possible so if you know of any New Speed Limits, when it will take effect, and/or the story of any possible increases for your state or any other state please let me know at kevina@clark.net; 7962 Helmart Dr., Laurel MD 20723. Be sure to include how you found out about the information. With out it I have no way to judge how valid it is. ---------------------------------------------------------------------- TABLE OF CONTENTS: 1) Changes Since Last Posting 2) Summary Chart 3) News Summary 4) Detailed List 5) Summary Summary 6) Original Summary Chart 7) Credits Etc. ---------------------------------------------------------------------- 1) CHANGES SINCE LAST POSTING ---------------------------------------------------------------------- (Changes stared indicate a significant change. Not all non-significant will show up in the Summary Chart) 9/6/97: WV, ME*, OH, TX 8/26/97: WV*, LA, MD 7/13/97: OR*, WV*, KS, TX ---------------------------------------------------------------------- 2) SUMMARY CHART ---------------------------------------------------------------------- The limits for the Current and Proposed limits are as follows: (Rural Freeway / Divided / UnDivided / Urban Freeway) The Change date is the date of the most recent rural freeway limit change. "Pre" stands for what the rural freeway limit was before the 55 mandate. Please see the Notes at the end of this chart for an explanation of what the various abbreviations mean. For a detailed breakdown of any state click on its name. State | Current Limit | Proposed Limit | applies to| Change| Pre ----------------------------------------------------------------------------- Alaska | 65 55 55 55 | | | 88/01 | 70 | | | | | Alabama | 70 65 55 65 | | | 96/05 | 70 | | | | | Arkansas | 70 55 55 55 | | | 96/08 | 75 | 65 55 55 55 | | trucks | | | | | | | Arizona | 75 55 55 55 | -- 65 65 65 | | 95/12 | 75 | | | | | California | 70 65 65* 65 | | | 96/01 | 70 | 55 55 55 55 | | combinat. | | | | | | | Colorado | 75 65 65 55 | | | 96/05 | 70 | | 55 55 55 55 | trucks | | | | | | | Conn. | 55 55 50 55 | 60 -- -- -- | | | 60 | | | | | Delaware | 65 55 50 55 | | | 96/01 | 60 | | | | | Florida | 70 65 55 55 | | | 96/04 | 70 | | | | | Georgia | 70 65 55 65 | | | 96/07 | 70 | | | | | Hawaii | 55 55 45 55 | | | | 70 | | | | | Iowa | 65 55 55 65* | | | 87/05 | 75 | | | | | Idaho | 75 65 65 55 | | | 96/05 | 70 | | | | | Illinois | 65 65 55 65* | | | 87/04 | 70 | 55 55 55 55 | | trucks | | | | | | | Indiana | 65 55 55 55 | | | 87/06 | 70 | | | | | Kansas | 70 70 65 55 | | | 96/03 | 75 | | | | | Kentucky | 65 55 55 55 | | | 87/06 | 70 | | | | | Louisiana | 70 65 55 60 | | | 97/07 | 70 | | | | | Mass. | 65 65 55 65 | | | 92/01 | 65 | | | | | Maryland | 65 55 55 60* | | | 95/07 | 70 | | | | | Maine | 65 55 55 55 | | | 87/06 | 70 | | | | | Michigan | 70 55 55 65 | | | 97/01 | 70 | 55 55 55 55 | 70 -- -- 65 mayb | trucks | | | | | | | Minnesota | 70 65 55 65 | | | 97/06 | 65 | | | | | Missouri | 70 70 60 60 | | | 96/03 | 70 | | | | | Miss. | 70 55 55 60 | -- 70 65 -- | | 96/03 | 70 | | | | | Montana | 00 00 00 55 | | day | 95/12 | 00* | 65 55 55 55 | | night | | | 65 60 60 55 | | trucks | | | | | | | Nebraska | 75 65 60 55 | | | 96/06 | 75 | | | | | N Carolina | 70 55 55 65 | | | 96/08 | 70 | | | | | N Dakota | 70 65 65 55 | | day | 96/07 | 75 | 70 55 55 55 | | night | | | | | | | N. Hamp. | 65 55 55 55 | | | 87/04 | 70 | | | | | New Jersey | 55 55 50 55 | 65 -- -- -- mayb | | | 60* | | | | | New Mexico | 75 70 65 55 | | | 96/02 | 70 | | | | | Nevada | 75 70 70 65 | | | 95/12 | 00 | | | | | New York | 65 55 55 65* | | | 95/08 | 65 | | | | | Ohio | 65 65 55 65 | | | 87/07 | 70 | 55 55 55 55 | | trucks | | | | | | | Oklahoma | 75* 70 65 60 | | day | 95/12 | 70 | 75* 65 55 60 | | night | | | 60 60 55 60 | | trucks | | | 55 55 55 55 | | nig truck | | | 65 50 ?? ?? | | school b. | | | | 75 -- 65 65 done | | | | | | | | Oregon | 65 55 55 55 | | | 87/09 | 75 | | | | | Penn. | 65 55 55 55 | -- -- -- 65 | | 95/07 | 65 | | | | | R. Island | 65 55 50 55 | | | 96/05 | 60 | | | | | S Carolina | 65 55 55 55 | | | 87/08 | 70 | | | | | S Dakota | 75 65 65 55 | | | 96/04 | 75 | 65 55 55 55 | | trucks | | | | | | | Tennessee | 65 65 55 65 | | | 87/05 | 75 | | | | | Texas | 70 70 70 70* | | day | 95/12 | 70 | 65 65 65 55 | | night | | | 60 60 60 55 | | trucks | | | 55 55 55 55 | | nig truck | | | 50 50 50 50 | | school b. | | | | | | | Utah | 75 65 55 65 | | | 96/06 | 70 | | | | | Virginia | 65 55 55 55 | | | 88/07 | 70 | | | | | Vermont | 65 55 50 55 | | | 87/04 | 65 | | | | | Washington | 70 70* 65* 60 | | | 96/03 | 70 | 60 60 60 60 | | trucks | | | | | | | Wisconsin | 65 55 55 55 | | | 87/06 | 70 | | | | | W Virginia | 70 65 55 60 | | | 97/08 | 70 | | | | | Wyoming | 75 65 65 60 | | | 95/12 | 75 | | | | | * For Montana: Daytime only, 55 non-interstate/65 interstate night limit * For Any Other State: Kind of, see the Detailed List for more info Notes: 00 = A reasonable & prudent speed or no speed limit ?? = A change possible, but I am not sure what to mayb = A possible change, but it is questionable done = A done deal, just waiting for the signs to be posted combinat. = combination vehicles nig truck = night, trucks school b. = school buses ---------------------------------------------------------------------- 3) NEWS SUMMARY ---------------------------------------------------------------------- Arizona (5/19/96) * ADOT has raised parts of AZ 85 to 65. Many other primary two-lane roads are under consideration as well, and the possibility of urban interstate increases are very much alive. California (5/05/97) * Most two lane roads in California are now posted at 55 however there are a few posted at 65. Connecticut (4/2/97) * A committee has approved a substitute for HB5262, which would increase the speed limit to 60 mph on several of Connecticut's roads, but not on I-95. Florida (5/23/97) * Some more portions of I-95 are going up from 55 to 65, and others from 65 to 70. Indiana (5/23/97) * Several bills that would have raised the speed limit to 70 on rural interstates and 65 on rural divided highways did not leave the committees before the session was over. There is a special session but the chances of the bills getting passed in this session are slim. Kansas (7/13/97) * Some more speed limits are going up on I-70, I-635, and I-435. Louisiana (7/02/97) * A Bill to raise the Speed limit to 70 mph (from 65) on interstates and 65 on other 4 lane (from 55) passed the House and Sent and the Governor has signed it into law. Speed limits started to go up after the forth of July and were all up by the middle of August. Maine (9/6/97) * A bill to raise parts of I-95 to 70, other parts of I-95 to 75, and all of I-495 to 75 mph was soundly defeated. Another bill which would have raised some urban interstates to 65 also failed. Maryland (8/26/96) * I-95 between the Capital and Baltimore Beltway was going to go to 65 mph as soon as road surface improvement project is done which should be sometime in mid July however it look like the limit increase has been stalled. Minnesota (7/02/97) * The Governor has decided to sign the speed limit bill in spite if not getting enough money for troupers. Speed limit to 70 mph on rural freeways, 65 on urban ones and 65 mph on other divided highways. Speed limits started going up on Tuesday, June 24. New Jersey (7/02/97) * The two speed limit bills were combined into one committee substitute bill (AB 731) and it easily passed the Assembly Law and Public Safety committee by a 5-1 vote on Monday, June 9. This bill will increases the speed limit on the state's interstates and toll roads to 65 mph. Ohio (9/6/97) * A bill (HB 305) which would make truck speed limits the same as cars was defeated 8-4 in a committee. Oregon (7/13/97) * The legislature has adjourned without passing a speed limit increase. The Senate passed two bills but they both died in the House Transportation Committee. One bill would have raised the rural interstate limit to 75; another would have repealed speed limits and let the transportation department set whatever limits are deemed safe. South Carolina (5/18/97) * Several bills to raise the speed limit in NC failed to get approval before the end of the 1997 legislative session (April 30, 1997). Tennessee (5/18/97) * With Gov. Don Sundquist applying pressure, state lawmakers have slammed the brakes on legislation to raise the speed limit to 70 mph on Tennessee's interstate highways. Texas (9/6/97) * Cites now have the option of increasing the speed limits for urban interstates from 55 to 70 mph under a new law signed into law. Some speed limits in the Houston area will be increased this fall. The bill which would have lowered speed limits from 70 to 60 on some 2 lane roads was defeated. West Virginia (9/6/97) * From August 25 to around September 6, West Virginia speed limits were increased from 65 to 70 on rural interstates, 55 to 65 on most divided highways and 60 on some urban stretches. ---------------------------------------------------------------------- 4) DETAILED LIST ---------------------------------------------------------------------- Alabama (5/23/97) * Had a Pre-NMSL Speed Limit of 70 * Adopted the 65 mph speed limit on July 20, 1987 * Effective May 21, 1996 the speed limit on Alabama rural interstates is now 70. The new limit is based upon House Bill 4323, which also raises the speed limits on 4-lane highways from 55 to 65, and urban interstates to 65. * The bill also includes a provision which prevents Interstate speed limit enforcement by municipal agencies whose population is less than 19000 (read "speed trap towns"). * Alabama State Legislature (No Bill Info) Alaska * Had a Pre-NMSL Speed Limit of 70 * Adopted the 65 mph speed limit on January 15, 1988 * Administrative action by state DOT & public safety is required to raise the speed limit. * Alaska State Legislature (Bill Text and Status, Current Law) * State DOT Site: http://www.dot.state.ak.us/ Arizona (5/19/96) * News Summary: ADOT has raised parts of AZ 85 to 65. Many other primary two-lane roads are under consideration as well, and the possibility of urban interstate increases are very much alive. * Had a Pre-NMSL Speed Limit of 75 * Adopted the 65 mph speed limit on April 15, 1987 * Went to 75 mph on rural interstates on December 8, 1995 * ADOT has raised the speed limit on AZ 85 (between Buckeye and Lukeville with exceptions through Gila Bend and Ajo) to 65 mph. This is the first non- interstate to see an increased speed limit in many years. Many other primary two-lane roads are under consideration as well, and the possibility of urban interstate increases are very much alive. * State DOT Site: http://www.dot.state.az.us/ * ALIS Online (Bill Text and Status, Current Law) Arkansas (7/19/96) * Had a Pre-NMSL Speed Limit of 75 * Adopted the 65 mph speed limit on April 12, 1987 * Administrative action by highway commission/department is required to raise the speed limit. * The Arkansas Highway Commission voted to wait six months before deciding whether to raise the speed limit on state highways. Goal: See how increased speeds affects fatality rates. * The wait is over! Arkansas has announced that they will in the middle of August of 96 implement a 70 miles an hour speed limit on rural interstates for cars only. Trucks will remain at 65. Decision came from the Highway Commission. * Government Relations Information (Bill Text only) California (5/05/97) * News Summary: Most two lane roads in California are now posted at 55 however there are a few posted at 65. * Had a Pre-NMSL Speed Limit of 70 * Adopted the 65 mph speed limit on May 28, 1987 * Raised many 55 Freeways to 65 on December 8, 1995 * Went to 70 mph on rural interstates on January 8, 1996 * Combination vehicles are limit to 55 mph. * Due to the passage SB 848 all two lane roads will default to 55 mph as well as any other non-freeways unless otherwise posted This is only a temporary bill, designed to avoid confusion and give traffic engineers time to conduct there studies, that will be in effect only to January 1 of 97. * Most two lane roads are now 55 however a there are a few posted at 65. Highway 1 from the San Mateo/Santa Cruz county line south for a few miles, and most of U.S. 97 from I-5 north to Oregon line is now posted at 65. There may be other posted at 65 near death vally. * Official California Legislative Information (Bill Text, Status and Current Law) * State DOT Site: http://www.dot.ca.gov/ * California is known for its Anti Speed Trap Laws. In Summary: To use radar, the enforced facility (road, highway, etc) must have a valid Speed Zone Survey, as your other correspondent noted and the posted speed limit must correspond to that survey. In other words, if the survey recommends a speed limit of 40 MPH, and the local jurisdiction posts "30 MPH" signs, any ticket written should be thrown out of court. "Airplane surveillance" tickets are illegal in California. (Ref: {ca-speed}) Colorado (2/03/97) * Had a Pre-NMSL Speed Limit of 70 * Adopted the 65 mph speed limit on April 10, 1987 * Legislative action is required to raise the speed limit. * In the 1996 legislative session SB 78 has been introduced which includes a provision limiting trucks to 55 mph including the 75mph interstates. Separate truck speed limits are a hazard to everyone. * Colorado Governor Roy Romer signed into law 75 MPH maximum speed limit on Friday, April 26, 1996. (HB 1069) Specifically, the law permits the state highway department to increase speeds at their discretion. So far as I know the law puts no restrictions on what roads will get what speeds. So this is really a motorists bill; the traffic engineers, not bureaucrats make the decisions. Count on long stretches of interstate (I-70, I-25, I-76) getting raised to 75, particularly in eastern Colorado. Increases are supposed to be posted around Memorial Day of 1996. * Apparently all other highways are now at 65 (with 2 and 4 lanes) * Colorado State Legislature Information (Bill Status but no Text) Connecticut (4/2/97) * News Summary: A committee has approved a substitute for HB5262, which would increase the speed limit to 60 mph on several of Connecticut's roads, but not on I-95. * Had a Pre-NMSL Speed Limit of 60 * Never did adopted the 65 mph speed limit * Has a 2 Lane Limit speed limit of 50 mph. * Administrative action by state traffic commission is required to raise the speed limit. Five bills have been introduced to raise the maximum speed limit to 65 mph: HB5255, HB5262, HB6439, SB118, and SB162. * A committee has approved a substitute for HB5262, which would increase the speed limit to 60 mph on several of Connecticut's roads, but not on I-95. A state study stated the limit on I-95 should remain 55 mph because of heavy traffic and dense population along the highway. * The House passed HB5262 by a vote of 96-50. The bill would allow the State Traffic Commission to increase the speed limit on qualified highways to 65 mph. Currently Connecticut is one of only three states (in addition to New Jersey and Hawaii) that still has a maximum limit of 55 mph. * Unfortunately the Senate voted 27-9 to kill the bill on the last day of this session, June 4. * A survey of the state's AAA members found 72 percent favor increasing the speed limit. AAA has asked the legislature to increase the limit to 60 or 65 mph. * A study by the state Department of Transportation shows 225 miles of Connecticut roads are physically suited for 60 and 65 mph speed limits. Despite this, the governor opposes raising the speed limit. * The legislature meets through June 4. * State DOT Site: http://www.ctstateu.edu/state/trans.html * Connecticut [Unofficial] General Assembly Information (No Bill Info Yet) Delaware (2/18/97) * Had a Pre-NMSL Speed Limit of 60 * Not eligible for the 65 mph speed limit. * Has a 2 Lane Limit speed limit of 50 mph. * Administrative action by state DOT was required to raise the speed limit. * In early January 1996, The Delaware Department of Transportation, after a study that began in November announced a 65 mile per hour limit for Delaware Rt., Dover -Smyrna Bypass and I-495 near Wilmington to take effect Jan. 12, 1996. The posting of signs was delayed until today 1/26/97 because of the weather. The 65 mile per hour limit is the highest posted limit Delaware has EVER had. The higher limit was rejected for I-95 due to "congestion". They will re- examine the issue in one year so see if the new limit caused more accidents. For some reason they did not realize that the higher limit might just REDUCE congestion on heavily traveled I-95. The other 4 lane roads will remain at 55 for the time being. * (2/18/97) According to Denise Gregory of the Delaware Department of Transportation saying that legislation on further speed limit increases are soon approaching for the First State. * Delaware's State Government (No Leg Info Yet) Florida (5/23/97) * News Summary: Some more portions of I-95 are going up from 55 to 65, and others from 65 to 70. * Had a Pre-NMSL Speed Limit of 70 * Adopted the 65 mph speed limit on April 29, 1987 * Administrative action by state DOT is required to raise the speed limit. * Florida law allows increases to 70 mph on case-by-case basis * Effective April 8th, 1996 the speed limit on I-10 between Pensacola and Jacksonville in Florida was raised to 70 mph * Other rural Interstate highways and rural portions of the Florida Turnpike will be posted at 70 mph by end of May. Florida DOT also says no speed limit increases are planned for urban sections of Interstates and the Turnpike, particularly in Dade and Broward counties. Some four-lane divided highways will also go to 65 by the end of May of 96. * Effective May 28, 1996 the following South Florida highways in Dade, Broward and Palm Beach Counties will have increased speed limits: I-75 from the Palmetto Expressway in Dade to Alligator Alley in Broward: 65 mph to 70. Alligator Alley: 65 mph to 70. The Homestead Extension of the Florida Turnpike from mile marker 11, near Old Cutler Road, to mile marker 27, just north of the Dolphin Expressway in Dade County: 55 mph to 60. U.S. 27 in Broward: 55 mph to 65. State Road 80 in western Palm Beach County from Royal Palm Beach Boulevard to Belle Glade: 55 to 65 mph * On May 22, 1997, in Broward and Palm Beach Counties, Florida, the speed limit on I-95 was raised from 55 to 65 mph; this increase is applicable to all of I-95 in Broward County, but in Palm Beach County, the speed limit will remain 55 mph on I-95 from Linton Boulevard in Delray Beach to Northlake Road in West Palm Beach until current construction projects are completed. Also the 65 mph limit on I-95 from PGA Boulevard in Palm Beach County to Ft. Pierce in St. Lucie County was raised to 70 mph on May 22; these speed limit changes were reported in today's edition (May 23, 1997) of the Miami Herald. * The Florida Legislature's Home Page (Bill Text and Status, Current Law) * State DOT Site: http://www.dot.state.fl.us/ Georgia (12/17/96) * Had a Pre-NMSL Speed Limit of 70 * Adopted the 65 mph speed limit on February 22, 1988 * Legislative action is required to raise the speed limit. * Speed limits should have go 70 on rural interstates, 65 on urban ones and 65 on other divided highways on July 1st, 1996 however on July 1 only rural interstes went up. The urban speed was to go to 65, but the TV reports say that will stay at 55 "for the time being". DOT is also still trying to determine specifically which parts of which 4-lane divided state roads will go up. That is on a case by case basis. * Georgia DOT is raising limits on December 17, 1996 from 55 to 65 on segments of I-75 in Cobb, Cherokee, Bartow, Henry and Clayton Counties; I-85 in Gwinnett, Coweta, and Fulton Counties; I-575 in Cobb and Cherokee Counties; I-675 in Henry, Clayton and DeKalb Counties; I-20 in Douglas, Cobb, Fulton, DeKalb, Rockdale, and Newton Counties; as well as major parts of GA 4, 6, 316, 365, 400, and 515. The limits should be going up starting December 17. * DOT engineers have been studying roads around the state and recommending increased speeds on some. This is the first round, and the study continues. Many rural four-lane roads are under consideration. * The speed limit bill was attached to a bill tightening seat belt laws. This bill was passed on the last day of the legislative session. * Georgia Online Network (No Leg Info Yet) * State DOT Site: http://www.dot.state.ga.us/ Hawaii * Has a Pre-NMSL Speed Limit of 70 * Never did adopted the 65 mph speed limit. * Has a 2 Lane Limit speed limit of 45 mph. * Legislative action is required to raise the speed limit. Idaho (12/01/96) * Had a Pre-NMSL Speed Limit of 70 * Adopted the 65 mph speed limit on May 2, 1987 * Legislative action was required to raise the speed limit. * On May 1, 1996 Speed Limits went to 75 mph on Interstates and 65 on state highways both 2 and 4 lane. (Thanks to S1432) * Idaho Legislature (Bill Text and Status) * State DOT Site: http://www.state.id.us/itd/itdhmpg.htm Illinois (12/01/96) * Had a Pre-NMSL Speed Limit of 70 * Adopted the 65 mph speed limit on April 29, 1987 * Administrative action by state DOT was required to raise the speed limit. * Many 55 roads went to 65 on December 8, 1995. * However the governor signed a bill setting two-lanes at 55 shortly after. He made it clear that 55 is the absolute caps for these roads. * The rural designation on interstates has been extended slightly sometime after the repeal. * Governor opposes changes but may support raising truck limits equal to car limits (truck limit 55) * Illinois General Assembly (No Bill Info) * State DOT Site: http://dot.state.il.us/ Indiana (5/23/97) * News Summary: Several bills that would have raised the speed limit to 70 on rural interstates and 65 on rural divided highways did not leave the committees before the session was over. There is a special session but the chances of the bills getting passed in this session are slim. * Had a Pre-NMSL Speed Limit of 70 * Adopted the 65 mph speed limit on June 1, 1987 * Administrative action by state DOT is required to raise the speed limit. * Several bills have been introduced for the 1997 legislative session. * SB 466 will raise the speed limit to 70 on rural interstates and 65 on rural divided highways. The bill will also remove the separate truck speed limit. * HB 1077 will basically do the same as SB 466. * However, nether bill left the committees before the 1997 session was over, except for a special session. Gary Cook (D-Plymouth), Chair of the House Transportation Committee and a Plymouth Police Officer, refused to give a hearing for the speed limit hike. The chances of either bill getting passed in the special session are slim. * Last year, the amendment to raise the speed limit to 70 mph on interstates and 65 on divided state highways was scratched at the last minute. Fortunately the amendment to make Photo radar legal was also scratched. (HB 1261) * Indiana General Assembly (Bill Text and Status, Current Law) * State DOT Site: http://source.isd.state.in.us/acin/dot/ Iowa (3/13/97) * Had a Pre-NMSL Speed Limit of 75 * Adopted the 65 mph speed limit on May 12, 1987 * Legislative action is required to raise the speed limit. * As passed by the House, SF 2140 raises speed limits on more roads than the Senates version of the bill. The House raises speed limits from 65 mph to 70 mph on interstates and on all divided multi-lane highways from 55 mph to 65 mph. Motor trucks, at the urging of the Iowa Motor Truck Association, would still be required to drive 65 mph. In contrast the Senate version would only raise the speed limit to 65 and only on interstate "look-a-likes". It's less than 200 miles of roadway in Iowa. * The Senate refused the House amendment. And the House receded from its amendment and sent the bill (SF 2140) back to the Senate as part of deal to get the Transportation budget (HF 2421) moving. The bill passed the Senate and now is awaiting the Governor signature. * Apparently the bill has passed sometime in March of 96 as non-interstate freeways went to 65, along with the extension of the "rural" designation on interstates in some places. * A new bill, HF403 would increase the maximum limit to 70 mph. It was approved by the House Transportation Committee with only one dissenting vote, however the House voted 52-47 to reject the bill. * Gov. Terry Branstad says Iowa doesn't need higher speed limits, according to States News Service. He said more deaths would result if the speed limit is increased. * Iowa General Assembly (Bill Text and Status, Current Law) Kansas (7/13/97) * News Summary: Some more speed limits are going up on I-70, I-635, and I-435. * Had a Pre-NMSL Speed Limit of 75 * The Kansas Turnpike was once set a 80 mph but was then lowered to 75 mph some time around 1970. * Adopted the 65 mph speed limit on May 14, 1987 * Kansas limits on March 21st went up to 70 on separated multilane highways (including interstates) and 60 on all other highways however they can be raised to 65 if it is deemed necessary based on a traffic study. With no day/night or car/truck limits. (House Bill 2602). The Interstates should be signed in 15 days, and other roads will be signed in 2-3 months from 3/13/96 * This bill also prevents insurance companies to give surcharges and the DMV from suspending licenses if you're less than 10 over on an interstate, and less than 5 over on other roads. The state, however still gets your money. * Some more speed limits are going up on several Kansas City area highways. The state transportation department sets limits at what 85 percent of drivers are going, up to the state's maximum 70 mph limit. * Limits will go up from 65 to 70 mph on I-70 from I-635 to Kansas 70; from 60 to 70 mph on I-435 from Shawnee Mission Parkway to Kansas 10; from 60 to 65 mph on I-435 from Kansas 10 to the Missouri border; and from 60 to 65 on Kansas 10 west of I-435. * INK Kansas Legislative Services (Bill text, Bill Status by Sub. Only) * State DOT Site: http://proto1.dot.state.ks.us/ Kentucky (3/14/96) * Had a Pre-NMSL Speed Limit of 70 * Adopted the 65 mph speed limit on June 8, 1987 * Legislative action is required to raise the speed limit. * They seemed to have gone home in April without raising the limit. * Bill SB 83 (1996 session), which passed the house and know goes to the senate, says The speed limit on highways in Kentucky shall be as follows: (1)Seventy (70) miles per hour on all interstates and four (4) lane limited access highways; (2)Sixty-five (65) miles per hour on two (2) lane limited access highways and four (4) lane highways that are not limited access highways; and (3)Sixty (60) miles per hour on all other highways. * Bill SB 291 (1996 session) extends this to 65mph in urban interstates. * Kentucky Legislature Home Page (Bill text Only) Louisiana (7/02/97) * News Summary: A Bill to raise the Speed limit to 70 mph (from 65) on interstates and 65 on other 4 lane (from 55) passed the House and Sent and the Governor has signed it into law. Speed limits started to go up after the forth of July and were all up by the middle of August. * Had a Pre-NMSL Speed Limit of 70 * Adopted the 65 mph speed limit on May 9, 1987 * Administrative action by highway commission/department is required to raise the speed limit. * Currently there are 8 bills to raise the speed limit. Here is a summary: Proposed maximum speed limits Bill# Author Interstate 4-lane hwys 2-lane hwys. HB 138 TRICHE & DOERGE 80 80 55 HB 112 WINDHORST 75 75 55 SB 194 HEITMEIR 75 75 65 HB 16 BRUN 70 70 70 SB 5 CAIN 70 65 60 SB 38 BEAN 70 70 70 SB 39 BEAN 70 65 65 SB 222 LANDRY 70 ?? ?? * And there may be others however I am not sure about the exact status of all of them… * It looks like a 70 mph speed limit is very close… * On May 13, 1997 The House Transportation Committee voted 8-1 to raise the interstate speed limit to 70 mph from 65 mph. Other speed limits would be 65 mph on four-lane highways with medians and 55 mph on two-lane state roads. The proposal, SB222 by Sen. Ron Landry, D-LaPlace, has been endorsed by a Senate committee, the 39-member Senate and the House committee. * The issue now goes to the 105-member House committee who rejected an amendment by Rep. Robert Marionneaux, D-Livonia, to keep the speed limit at 65 mph for tractor-trailer rigs on interstate highways. Marionneaux said the amendment should have been added because it's tougher to slow down an 18-wheeler than a car. However, Diez said, studies have shown it's safer to keep the speed limit the same for all drivers. * The vote according to the House journal was 93-3. I think the Senate is scheduled to look at the bill today (July 5). An amendment by Rep. Robert Marionneaux-D, Livonia to keep trucks at 65 mph on all roads failed 21-78. The three representatives voting against SB 222 were: Robert Faucheux-D, LaPlace, Donald Kennard-R, Baton Rouge, and Robert Marionneaux-D, Livonia * The House and Senate finally completed action on a speed limit increase Monday. SB222, sponsored by Sen. Ron Landry, D-LaPlace, has been sent to Gov. Mike Foster, who said he will sign it into law. * The new speed limit signes went up between the 4th of July and mid-August. Pretty much all the rural interstates went to 70. so far, it appears that urban interstates wento 60 except for 50 to 55 in Baton Rouge. Most 4 lane highways wen up to 65 mph. * The Louisiana Department of Transportation and Development supports a 70 mph speed limit. * Unfortunately, the governor is against higher limits, since he "doesn't like to drive fast." * Louisiana State Legislature (Bill Status, Summary, and Text under the Senate page) Maine (9/6/97) * News Summary: A bill to raise parts of I-95 to 70, other parts of I-95 to 75, and all of I-495 to 75 mph was soundly defeated. Another bill which would have raised some urban interstates to 65 also failed. * Had a Pre-NMSL Speed Limit of 70 * Adopted the 65 mph speed limit on June 12, 1987 * Administrative action by state DOT is required to raise the speed limit. * A bill sponsored by Rep. Robert Cameron, R-Rumford, which would have required the Maine DOT to study increasing the speed limit from 55 to 65 mph on I-395 around Bangor and I-295 around Portland was defeated. Interstate highways outside the urban areas are posted at 65 mph. Cameron argued that maintaining an artificially low maximum speed limit in urban areas is needless and only serves as a speed trap and revenue maker for police. * Another bill, sponsored by Rep. Adam Mack, R-Standish was sourly defeated. I would have increase the speed limit to 70 mph on I-95 below Exit ^A in Scarborough, and to 75 mph on I-95 above Exit 15 in Falmouth. The speed limit in I-495 north of Exit 10 in Falmouth would have been increased to 75 mph. Opposition was, unfortunately, widespread. It came from the governor, transportation and safety officials, and others. * The chairman of the Transportation Panel believes that they are a couple of members on the committee that believe there is some justification for maybe increasing the speed limit on some stretches of highway, such as between Orono and Houlton and between Lewiston and Gardiner * The legislature meets through June 18. * Maine Legislative Guide (Selected Bill Info and Current Law) Maryland (8/26/96) * News Summary: I-95 between the Capital and Baltimore Beltway was going to go to 65 mph as soon as road surface improvement project is done which should be sometime in mid July however it look like the limit increase has been stalled. * Had a Pre-NMSL Speed Limit of 70 * Adopted the 65 mph speed limit on July 1, 1995 * Legislative action is required to raise the speed limit. * Maryland will raise the speed limit from 55 to 60-65 mph on 85 miles of highways by the end of July of 96. * Some of the roads that went up to 65 include I-97 near Annapolis and I-83 north of Shawan Road. Some of the secments that went to 60 include I-70 and I-68 near the intersection of the two, I-83 from Shawan Road to 695, and US-50 from I-97 to US 301. (I am not sure I-70 from 29 to 695 went up as it was proposed). * State officials said they may increase some of the new 60 mph limits to 65 on some routes if traffic seems to move safely at 60. They also expect to introduce more 60 or 65 mph speed zones next spring, possibly on stretches of Route 50 on the Eastern Shore. * According to the MD DOT I-95 between the Capital and Baltimore Beltway is going to go to 65 mph as soon as road surface improvement project is done. This should be sometime in mid July. There is talk of increasing the 60 secment of US 50 to to 65 (Importent Note: the signes themselves are 65 with a 0 stuck over the 5 for US 50). * Current law allows MD DOT to set the speed limit to 65 mph on all freeways and 55 mph elsewhere. * Maryland's Legislative Branch (No Bill Info) * State DOT Site: http://www.inform.umd.edu/UMS+State/MDResources/MDOT Massachusetts * Had a Pre-NMSL Speed Limit of 65 * Adopted the 65 mph speed limit on January 5, 1992 * Legislative action was required to raise the speed limit. * Effective January 29, 1996, the speed limit will rise to 65 mph on over 400 miles of divided highways. Some affected routes are the entire Mass. Pike west of Route 128, and Interstate 190 between Worcester and Route 2 in Legislator. * The Great and General Court (Bill Status Only) Michigan (7/3/96) * Had a Pre-NMSL Speed Limit of 70 * Adopted the 65 mph speed limit on November 29, 1987 * Legislative action was required to raise the speed limit. * Most 55 MPH roads become 65 on the weekend of June 29 and 40th. * On Aug 1 of 96 the following sections of road went to 70 MPH for testing (see below for more info): I-94 between M-59 and Port Huron; I-69 between the Indiana border and Port Huron; I-96 between Muskegon and Lansing; I-75 from Standish to the Soo; and US 131 from Grand Rapids to Cadillac. * The 70 MPH test on portions of state freeways ended October 31st. Now MDOT has until December 15th to present their "findings" to the legislature. Then the legislature has until January 1st to vote on the issue. It is unclear if the number of freeways posted at 70 can be increased. * The Results are in! Most freeways will go to 70 MPH on January 1, 1997. See the Press Release for more info. * Currently trucks and buses are still limited to 55 on all highways. However, it repeal should happen in the near future, since the truckers have a more powerful lobby than the NMA does and also a 15 mph differential is just pure dangerous. * Senate substitute for HB-5123 successfully passed both the Senate and the House and was signed into law on 6/27/96. The more significant points are as follows: 1) By July 1, MDOT in "consultation" with MSP establishes five test segments with speed limits of 70. The test ends September 30 and the "study" completed by November 15. Then, MDOT sets permanent speed limits of 70 mph based on the results no later than January 1, 1997. (The allowing of test zones to 75mph was scratched) 2) Speed limits on the remaining freeways are raised to 65-mph immediately, with the exception of up to 170 highway miles designated by MDOT at less than 65-mph. 3) Fines for speeding--but not points--are doubled in construction and school zones. (Unsure if this is still included) 4) Insurance companies may not consider speeding violations of up to 10-mph over a 55-mph limit on a limited access highway for eligibility or premiums. 5) Primary enforcement of seatbelt laws NOT included. * Also, Governor Engler now perceives that "public opinion" now supports higher speed limits! This is a big success for Michigan Motorists and the National Motorist Association. Without all of our letters and phone calls 70 would never have happened. * For more info see the Michigan Motorist News page put out by the Michigan Chapter of the National Motorists Association * Michigan Legislative Branch (No Bill Info) * State DOT Site: http://www.mdot.state.mi.us/ Minnesota (7/02/97) * News Summary: The Governor has decided to sign the speed limit bill in spite if not getting enough money for troupers. Speed limit to 70 mph on rural freeways, 65 on urban ones and 65 mph on other divided highways. Speed limits started going up on Tuesday, June 24. * Had a Pre-NMSL Speed Limit of 65 * Adopted the 65 mph speed limit on June 17, 1987 * Administrative action by transportation commissioners is required to raise the speed limit. * The Transportation Commissioner James Denn has the authority to change speed limits without legislative action. However, Denn says won't do it alone. * A 1997 bill, SB592 would raise the maximum speed limit to 70 mph on rural freeways and to 65 mph in other locations. The bill also would repeal the law barring the recording of speeding violations that are less than 10 mph over the speed limit. * Speed limits on almost every mile of divided highway and freeway in the state would be increased under a bill passed by the Senate on Tuesday April 22. The house passed a similar bill about a month ago. Under the bill speed limits will become: 70 mph on 717 miles of rural interstates from 65 mph. 70 mph on 913 miles four-lane state highways from 55 mph. 65 mph on 198 miles of metropolitan interstate freeways from 55 mph 103 miles of divided four-lane metropolitan interstate freeways from 55 mph * The bill now goes back to the House, where legislators are expected to ask for a House-Senate conference committee to resolve differences between the two versions. * Unlike the Senate version, the House would not increase the limit on metropolitan freeways. The House bill would lift the 45 mph limit on the parkway-like stretch of I-35E between I-94 and W. 7th St. in St. Paul, placing it at 55 mph. The Senate bill would keep the limit at 45 mph. * Both the House and the Senate agreed on a bill that will set the speed limit to: 70 mph on rural interstates 65 mph on four-lane state highways (both metropolitan and rural) 65 mph on urban interstates. The bill passed 40-16 in the Senate, and 120-13 in the House * It now awaits Gov. Arne Carlson signature. Whether the governor will sign the bill is unclear. Carlson has said he wants money for 75 state troopers before he would agree to raise speed limits, and legislators have not decided how many extra troopers to authorize. Also, the governor's spokesman said Tuesday that Carlson was troubled by the increase in metro-area speed limits. * ..This is the second time in two years the Legislature has raised speed limits on most highways. Last year, the governor used his executive power to cancel speed limit increases authorized by the Legislature. The bill approved this week takes away that power unless the transportation commissioner first conducts speed and engineering studies of sections of highways where he intends to alter speed limits. The 1996 speed limit bill would have increased limits on rural four-lane highways to 65. This year's bill goes further, increasing the legal speeds on urban interstate freeways and four-lane highways. * The Governor has decided to sign the speed limit bill on July 3, 1997 in spite if not getting enough money for troupers! * Speed limits started going up Tuesday, June 22, a week before they were planned to go up which was July 1! * Bill(s) to raise the speed limit to 70 mph were introduced in 1996. However, both the House and Senate committees dropped the idea. The plan ran into opposition from all sides. The speed limit on rural interstates would have been increased to 70 mph, on urban interstates and other 4-lane divided highways to 65 mph, and on other 2 - lane highways under State jurisdiction to 65 mph during day time and 60 mph at night. No change would have made on highways under city or county jurisdiction. * The legislature meets through May 19. * Minnesota State Legislature (Bill Text and Status, Current Law) * State DOT Site: http://www.dot.state.mn.us/main/mndot.html Mississippi (6/2/96) * Had a Pre-NMSL Speed Limit of 70 * Adopted the 65 mph speed limit on April 14, 1987 * Administrative action by transportation commissioners was required to raise the speed limit. * On March 12, 1996 speed limits on Interstates went to 70 mph thanks to a bill signed into law on Fed 29, 1996. This bill also allows the Mississippi Transportation Commission to increase speed limits to 70 on four-lane highways and to 65 on other roads. * Apparently some urban interstates are now 60. * Mississippi State Gov. Home Pages (Doesn't appear to have Leg. Info) Missouri (3/18/96) * Had a Pre-NMSL Speed Limit of 70 * Adopted the 65 mph speed limit on May 1, 1987 * Bill HB1047 was signed into law on March 13, 1996, this bill will set the speed limits as follows: 70 miles per hour on rural interstates and freeways; 65 miles per hour on four-lane divided expressways in rural areas; 60 miles per hour on interstate highways, freeways, or expressways within urbanized areas; 60 miles per hour on two-lane numbered roads; and 55 miles per hour on two-lane lettered routes. The Highways and Transportation Commission may set the speed limit higher or lower than the uniform maximum speed limit if such is recommended by the Department of Highways and Transportation but not greater than 70 mph. * Missouri General Assembly (Bill Summaries and Status) Montana (2/16/97) * Had no Daytime Speed limit before the NMSL * Adopted the 65 mph speed limit on April 16, 1987 * Went to no daytime speed limit on December 8, 1995 * Nighttime speed limit of 65 mph for interstates, 55 for others * Truck (over 8,000 lbs) limit to 65mph on interstates and 60 on other roads. * Triples held to 55 * Speeds are up about 2mph and fatalities are up slightly; however, MODOT feels that there is no correlation between this increase and the change in speed limits. The highway patrol still wants speed limit. The Governor too. (revenue concerns, political pressure) DOT says one is not warranted. Patrol very worried about staffing levels. DOT has decided to pay for patrol personnel to cover the reduced revenues, which were way down, from citations. This agreement runs out at end of year. They (MODOT) are very determined to keep the limit as is. Local judges from what I've heard are not dismissing too many tickets. Even though the officers have "no training" in what constitutes a safe speed, they are in court daily claiming speeds too fast for conditions. New quasi limit 90 mph. * The days of a "reasonable and prudent" speed limit in Montana may be coming to an end. SB 64 was introduced by Crippen, Brunce and is scheduled for a hearing on January 30 at 1:00 pm in the Senate. The bill would post a 75 mph daytime limit for intestates, 65 elsewhere and would make speeding up to 10 mph over the limit a $25 fine with no points. (Representative Daryl had a similar bill that never got introduced) However, the Senate overwhelmingly rejected establishing a 80-mph daytime speed limit. The February 14 vote was 41-8 against Senate Bill 64. The governor had asked for a 75-mph daytime limit. * "I went door to door during the election," Sen. Barry Stang told AP. "A good percentage didn't think government had any business interfering in how fast people want to drive." (State DOT Site) * Montana Legislative Branch (Bill Text and Status) * Montana is known for its clever way around the NMSL when it was in effect. It had a $5 no points daytime "energy waste" speeding ticket. The nighttime speed tax was and still is $70. As soon as the NMSL got repealed the went back to a "reasonable and prudent" limit. (Ref: {mt-law}) Nebraska (12/01/96) * Had a Pre-NMSL Speed Limit of 75 * Adopted the 65 mph speed limit on April 27, 1987 * On June 1, 1996 the speed limit on rural interstates went to 75 mph, 4-laners went to 65, and 2-laners went to 60 all thanks to the passage of Bill 901. * Nebraska Legislative Documents (Bill Text and Status, Current Law) Nevada (5/17/96) * Did not have any Speed Limit before the NMSL * Adopted the 65 mph speed limit on April 13, 1987 * Went to 75 mph for rural interstates and 65 for urban ones December 8, 1995 * Went to 70 mph on other roads sometime after (not sure what type of roads this includes) * I-15 from the California Border to Las Vegas - 70 mph US 95 North of Las Vegas - 70 mph I-15 Northeast of Las Vegas to Arizona - 75 mph I-80 From Reno to Utah - variable from 55 to 75 mph Areas US 50 from Lake Tahoe to Ely and Utah - 65mph US 395 North of Carson to Reno - 70 mph US 95 THROUGH downtown Las Vegas is now 65 mph! All other interstates within any city limits - still 55 mph * State of Nevada (Couldn't access site) * State DOT Site: http://www.nscee.edu/unlv/Research/centers/1994/page18.html * Nevada was the last state to give into the federally imposed 55-mph limit in 1975 and was the first state to try to officially break it. In July of 1986 they upped the speed limit to 70 mph on a short stretch of I-80. They hoped that coupling the higher speed limit with a mandatory seat-belt requirement would induce the feds to exempt Nevada from the 55-mph restriction. No such luck. When the Federal Highway Administration promptly announced a cutoff of road-building funds the state just as quickly backed of. But not without vowing to fight: the state filed a suite against the Federal Government, calling it a violation of states' rights! (Source: Time, July 13, 1986: p 27) New Hampshire (3/23/96) * Had a Pre-NMSL Speed Limit of 70 * Adopted the 65 mph speed limit on April 16, 1987 * Administrative action by governor is required to raise the speed limit. * HB 758 Calls for raising the interstate speed limit to 75 on interstates and 65 elsewhere however it was rejected by the house. * HB 306 would also increase the maximum speed limit to 75 mph. * The legislature meets through mid-June. * The New Hampshire General Court (No Leg. Info) New Jersey (7/02/97) * News Summary: The two speed limit bills were combined into one committee substitute bill (AB 731) and it easily passed the Assembly Law and Public Safety committee by a 5-1 vote on Monday, June 9. This bill will increases the speed limit on the state's interstates and toll roads to 65 mph. * Had a Pre-NMSL Speed Limit of 60 for the most part. * The Atlantic City Expressway was 70 mph and parts of other expressways were 65 * Never did adopted the 65 mph speed limit. * Has a 2 Lane Limit speed limit of 50 mph. * Administrative action is required to raise the speed limit. * Assemblyman Guy Gregg has introduced bills to raise the speed limit because the administration is not moving to raise the limit administratively. (A-731 and A-732) However, they contain the old language from the pre-NMSL repeal days since they were simply reintroduced with no changes. They will be changed in committee to reflect the language now in the aforementioned senate bills. * Senator Dick LaRossa has also introduced two bills to raise the speed limit in the senate, S-1278 for state highways and S-1105 for NJ's three toll roads. These bills contain NMA's language for forcing this issue on the administration. * The chances of NJ speed limits going up are likely thanks to the outcome of a assembly committee legislative hearing however further legislative action is are not likely until September. * The two speed limit bills (A-731 and A-732) were combined into one committee substitute bill (AB 731) and it easily passed the Assembly Law and Public Safety committee by a 5-1 vote on Monday, June 9. This bill will increases the speed limit on the state's interstates and toll roads to 65 mph. No one from the administration showed up this time and, again, there was no one from the public or another group that came to support the 55 mph speed limit. * However, it is questionable if the governor will sign a bill increasing New Jersey's speed limits. * NMA's approach is to call for a 65 mph statutory limit but not to place a maximum cap. Therefore, if 85th percentile is properly adopted as DOT's procedure, NJ could have 70 mph speed limits again, hopefully in more places. * State DOT Site: http://www.state.nj.us/transportation/ * New Jersey State Legislature (Bill Text) New Mexico (12/01/96) * Had a Pre-NMSL Speed Limit of 70 * Adopted the 65 mph speed limit on April 2, 1987 * Administrative action by highway commission/department was required to raise the speed limit. * Went to 75 mph on interstates probably sometime in February. * 4-lane highways with shoulder are now signed at 70. * 2-lane federal/state highways with shoulder with shoulders are now signed at 65 and 2-lane Federal/state highways with no shoulder are signed 60 or 55 mph. * State of New Mexico - 1996 Bill Locator (Bill Text and Status) New York * Had a Pre-NMSL Speed Limit of 65 * Adopted the 65 mph speed limit on August 1, 1995 * Legislative action is required to raise the speed limit. * MORE 65 in NY!!!! Well, about 40 more miles, at this time. Basically, those urban areas around Albany, Buffalo, Rochester and Syracuse that were posted 55 will be raised to 65 on or about July 14, 1996. Actually, the signs will be up before then. It is important to note that the NYDOT is NOT raising the limit on these stretches, the NYS Thruway Authority is. This is an important distinction. The NY Thruway Authority is not really a state agency, like NYDOT, and plays by a different set of rules. So basically, the Authority said "plbbbt" to the Legislature and said 65 is the way to go. * Inside info aside: (1) Don't be surprised if all of a sudden you see, in the next year, the NYDOT do the same, but as an "independent test". (2) Don't be surprised if you see 70mph signs on the Thruway in 2 years time. from NY NMA SCC * New York State Assembly (Bill Text and Status, Current Law) North Carolina (11/25/96) * Had a Pre-NMSL Speed Limit of 70 * Adopted the 65 mph speed limit on August 14, 1987 * Administrative action by state DOT was required to raise the speed limit. * Transportation officials can already raise limits to 70 mph on interstate highways without legislators' permission. Now, about 600 miles of N.C. interstates are set at 65 mph, and 370 miles at 55 mph. * North Carolina has passed S1270 (1996), allowing the state DOT to raise the limit to 70 on interstates (and non-interstate freeways on Oct 1, 1996 thanks to a passage of a separate bill) and making it a misdemeanor to do 15 over or more than 80. The bill is now law as North Carolina is the only state in the country whose governor has no veto power. Once a bill is passed by both houses of the General Assembly, it becomes law, period. * On Monday, Aug 5, 1996, 206 miles of rural interstate highways went to 70 and 75 miles of urban interstates went to either 60 or 65. Some of the roads that will go to 70 are I-40, I-95, and I-75. (See NCDOT's Press Release for more info) * On May 5, 1886, 165 miles of interstate highway will be signed at 55, 29 miles will be signed at 60, 470 will be signed at 65, and 206 miles will be signed at 70. * On Sept 6, 1996, SCDOT announced that 306 miles of non interstate freeways will go to 65 and another 33 to 60. (See NCDOT's Press Release for more info) * State DOT Site: http://www.dot.state.nc.us/DOT/ * North Carolina General Assembly (Bill Info and Status) North Dakota (3/23/97) * Had a Pre-NMSL Speed Limit of 70 * Adopted the 65 mph speed limit on April 16, 1987 * Legislature considering increase * Legislative action is required to raise the speed limit. * On July 1, 1996, Interstates went to 70, and US 2,83, and 281 went to 65 day/ 55 night. Part of these roads were 4 lane divided, part of them were 2 lane. Both parts went 65. * This was the result of North Dakota's Dep't of Transportation. The DOT can do so without the legislature's permission. One of the reason they went to 70 and not 75 was for minimal cost. Gov. Schafer says. Raising the limit to 75 mph would cost about $1 million for guardrails and approaches. * In 1997 the House sent the Senate legislation (HB1074) that would raise the speed limit on all state two-lane highways to 65 mph during the day (although according to my info it is already 65) and 60 mph at night, but rejected raising the maximum speed limit to 75 mph. * The House bill is now in the Senate Transportation Committee, where Chairman Bob Stenehjem says he wants the maximum limit raised to 75 mph. * Apparently this bill (HB 1074) got killed. * North Dakota Legislative Branch (No Bill Info) Ohio (9/6/97) * News Summary: A bill (HB 305) which would make truck speed limits the same as cars was defeated 8-4 in a committee. * Had a Pre-NMSL Speed Limit of 70 * Adopted the 65 mph speed limit on July 15, 1987 * Legislative action was required to raise the speed limit. * Ohio HB 305 was defeated 8-4 in committee. It would have allowed the same speed limit for cars as for trucks. * Another bill, which is still pending in the committee) would allow trucks to have the same speed limit as cars on the Ohio Turnpike for one year. After that, the General Assembly would decide to allow trucks to do 65 wherever cars can or if the limit for trucks reverts to 55. * On Feb 29, 1996 the Governor signed a bill allowing car speed limits to rise to 65 on freeways/interstates currently posted at 55. The Ohio DOT must complete its studies and post signs by June 28, 1996, on Interstates and other freeways. ODOT has until March 25, 1997, to implement 65-mph limits on other divided highways that are part of the National Highway System. The bad news is that freeways have not returned to their pre-1974 70-mph limits, plus the 55-mph truck limit was retained. The good news is that other divided highways will get 65-mph limits, even though they only had 50-mph to 60-mph limits before the National Maximum Speed Limit was imposed in 1974. * On around 5/24/96 I-675 around Dayton became the first Ohio freeway to benefit from the national speed limit repeal. Until May 24 1996, the road had two 55 mph zones sandwiched in between three 65 mph speed zones. It is now all 65 mph. * ODOT and its districts have basically decided what urban freeways and divided highways will receive a speed limit increase. Changes will be posted by July 28. See ODOT's Press Release for more info or see the link below. * Governor opposed to increases beyond 65. The Chairman of the Ohio House Transportation and Public Safety Committee, Rep. Samuel T. Bateman, Jr. would like to see 75 mph limits on rural interstates. It is not a guaranteed move however, since Bateman's counterpart in the Senate, Sen. Scott Oelslager, is not a supporter of higher limits and is sponsoring a bill to keep speed limits where they are now. Governor Voinovich does not support higher limits either. (Not sure on the chances of Ohio going beyond 65 now that the above bill has passed) * For a list of all speed limit changes see Planet Ohio (Your Online Source for Ohio Highway News & Information) * State DOT Site: http://www.dot.state.oh.us/ * Ohio Legislative Branch (No Bill Info) Oklahoma (2/18/97) * Had a Pre-NMSL Speed Limit of 70 * Adopted the 65 mph speed limit on April 6, 1987 * Went to 75mph on the turnpike, 70 mph for cars on rural interstates and other divide highways and 65 day/55 nigh on others on December 15, 1995. Urban interstates are now 60 mph. Truck speed limit was 65 before December 15 but they are now restricted to 60 day/55 night. (What the pre-NMSL limit was) * Senate Bill 685 was passed on 2/26/96 to set the speed limit on interstates at 75 MPH for ALL vehicles, including all trucks. Minimums will be set at 55 on the turnpikes and 50 on other interstates. The bill also sets the speed limit at 65 on all 2-lane roads for all vehicles, with no night restriction. This ends all non-uniform speed limits in the state. * The House added amendments to it and sent it back to the Senate. Final action is expected soon. Both houses agreed on bringing truck speeds in line with car speed limits, and removing the nighttime speed limits, but are bickering over what speed limit to set. * On around 6/12/96 The Senate voted to permit 75mph speed limits on Oklahoma's interstates recently. Senate Bill 685 was approved and sent to the House. It sets a 70 mph limit on four-lane highways, and sets a 65 mph limit for two-lane roads except county roads which will be capped at 55 unless the county commissioners want to raise it. The bill also includes language to prevent cities from turning remote roads into speed traps. It's unknown if the bill will repeal the state's night and truck speed limits. * (2/18/97) Oklahoma has passed HB 685, the governor has signed it (but I am not sure when he did), the new speed limit is 75 on all rural interstates. Signs have not been erected yet, and I am not sure as to when the new speed limit will be implemented. * State DOT Site: http://www.okladot.state.ok.us/ * Oklahoma Legislature (No Bill Info) Oregon (7/13/97) * News Summary: The legislature has adjourned without passing a speed limit increase. The Senate passed two bills but they both died in the House Transportation Committee. One bill would have raised the rural interstate limit to 75; another would have repealed speed limits and let the transportation department set whatever limits are deemed safe. * Had a Pre-NMSL Speed Limit of 75 * Adopted the 65 mph speed limit on September 27, 1987 * Administrative action by state DOT is required to raise the speed limit. * The Oregon legislature meets in January 1997 (the first time since repeal) and is expected to take up the issue. Oregon is the only western state hanging on to 65 mph. * Oregon State Senator Randy Miller will be introducing a bill to raise Oregon's freeway limits sometime in early February. They will probably go to 75. * HB 2553 would repeal the 65 mph maximum speed limit and allow the Department of Transportation to set appropriate speed limits * SB 458 which has strong support, will *permit* (not require) ODOT to raise freeway limits, no higher than 75 (I assume it is by State Senator Randy Miller but I am not sure yet) raced through the Senate of the week of May 10, 1997. * However it hid a speed bump when it went to the house. The House Transportation Committee is refusing to pass it to the full house for a vote. Not even one member is willing to make a motion to send the bill to the House floor. The Committee Chair reportedly was impressed by testimony from the State Patrol suggesting that raising limits would require the hiring of at least 100 more troopers. (With a vast improvement in speed limit compliance, what does he suppose these new troopers will do, exactly?) Another Committee member (Josi) admitted that he drives over 70 mph now, but is afraid that if the limit were 75, he'd drive 80. * SB458 still appears to be stuck in the House Transportation Committee. * The Senate Committee on Rules and Elections introduced SB1218 June 9 to repeal the speed limit on rural interstates. It also allows the Department of Transportation to set speed limits on other roads. It is not clear from reading the bill whether the DOT would be able to set a reasonable speed limit on rural interstates, or whether there would be no speed limit. It passed through the senate shortly after. * However, it never made it past the House Transportation Committee. Not a single member was willing to vote for it. * Oregon is the only state in the West to hold onto the old 65 mph limits, while the rest have shown that increasing limits doesn't increase actual speeds. * Unfortunate the the legislature has adjourned without passing a speed limit increase. The House didn't even vote on either bill that passed through the senate. * The ODOT proposed plan sets rural interstates at 70 mph, and urban at 60 mph. * Hearings and a vote have not yet been scheduled. * The Oregon Legislature gopher server (Text of Bills but doesn't include an index). * State DOT Site: gopher://gopher.odot.state.or.us/ Pennsylvania (4/27/96) * Had a Pre-NMSL Speed Limit of 65 * Adopted the 65 mph speed limit on July 15, 1995 * Legislative action is required to raise the speed limit. * Transportation Secretary Bradley L. Mallory today authorized the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation to increase the maximum speed limit to 65 mph on an additional 103 miles of selected, limited access highways across the state that could not be raised before the NMSL. Signs should be posted sometime in May of 96. * Additional 65 mph Non-Interstate Highways: US 15 -- from Maryland to 2.5 miles North of PA 234 (23 mi.) US 22/322 -- from Mifflintown Exit to one miles west of the Amity Hall Interchange (32 mi.) US 119 -- from US 422 to PA 110 (6 mi.) US 220 -- from Salona Exit to PA 287 (17 mi.) US 222 -- from US 30 to the Brownstown Exit (3 mi.) US 422 -- from PA 6422 to the Pikes Peak Exit (13 mi.) US 422 -- from PA 60 to Ellwood Road (5 mi.) PA 43 -- from the US 40 to near I-70 (4 mi.) * A PADOT engineer says that the 1995 65 enabling legislation codified the "outside urbanized area" requirement from the old NMSLs. Therefore, it would take additional legislative action to raise limits on urbanized freeways. That same engineer thought that this might happen soon. Interestingly enough, any political pressure exerted during the evaluation of those additional 65 zones FAVORED increases. * State DOT Site: http://www-penninfo.upenn.edu:1962/penninfo-srv.upenn.edu/9000/1 1298.html * Pennsylvania Government (No Bill Info) Rhode Island (4/12/96) * Had a Pre-NMSL Speed Limit of 60 * Never did adopted the 65 mph speed limit * Has a 2 Lane Limit speed limit of 50 mph. * Administrative action by state traffic commission is required to raise the speed limit. * On May 12,1996 the speed limit went to 65 on all of I-295 and I-95 from the CT line to the Rt 4 interchange. The RI State Traffic Commission voted 4-2 just before 11 am April 12 from this increase. This was solely the result of the work done by our RI coordinator, Tom Frank. If no one else had pushed 65, the RI State Police's anti-65 attitude would have carried the day. * Rhode Island State Archives (No Leg. Info Yet) South Carolina (5/18/97) * News Summary: Several bills to raise the speed limit in NC failed to get approval before the end of the 1997 legislative session (April 30, 1997). * Had a Pre-NMSL Speed Limit of 70 * Adopted the 65 mph speed limit on July 16, 1987 * Administrative action by state DOT is required to raise the speed limit. * The higher speed limits (70 on interstates and all others, for 1996) lost out to lawmakers' desire to go home. Senators killed the measure on a 30-7 vote after Senate Transportation Chairman John Land made it clear he wouldn't let them finish their work Thursday unless they did. Land, a Clarendon Democrat who has refused to let his committee take up the bill, said faster speeds could lead to more deaths on the road. He said senators need to study data from other states on death rates before deciding to raise the limits here. * The state Transportation Department already has studied speed limits and recommended letting motorists drive 70 mph on interstate highways in sparsely populated areas, 65 mph in metropolitan areas and 60 mph on other multilane divided highways in rural areas. * A spokeswoman said Gov. David Beasley's staff was looking into whether he could raise the speed limits himself. Beasley punted the issue to lawmakers last year after Congress abolished federal speed limits. (From a News Article in May, 1996) * State Senator John Land, the roadblock for 70 mph in South Carolina last year, was re-elected in November of 96. Here is his homepage, with e-mail, snail mail, and phone info. http://www.lpitr.state.sc.us/sdist36.htm . He's been in the senate since 1977. * However, several bills got introduced for the 1997 Legislative Session: * GB 3150 would allow speed limits to be 70 on freeways, and 60 on other divided highways. * GB 3173 would allow the speed limit to be 70 mph on portions of the interstate highway system. * CR 3232 would make the maximum speed limit along Interstate Highway 77 between Exits 22 and 77 is seventy miles an hour. * Unfortunately all of these bills failed to get approval before the end of the legislative session (April 30, 1997). This means they will be reintroduced next year. * South Carolina General Assembly (Bill Text and Status) South Dakota (7/8/96) * Had a Pre-NMSL Speed Limit of 75 * Adopted the 65 mph speed limit on April 15, 1987 * The speed limit on Interstates went to 75 on April 1, 1996. * The speed limit for all STATE and U.S. highways other than the Interstates is 65 MPH; however, Counties are authorized to either raise County road speed limits OR maintain the original speed limit of 55. This was done, in part, due to the factors of road wear AND slow-moving traffic (e.g. farm equipment) on such roads. * Trucks are still limited to 65 on interstates and 55 on others. * State DOT Site: http://www.state.sd.us/state/executive/dot/dot.html * Legislative Research Council (No Bill Info Yet) Tennessee (5/18/97) * News Summary: With Gov. Don Sundquist applying pressure, state lawmakers have slammed the brakes on legislation to raise the speed limit to 70 mph on Tennessee's interstate highways. * Had a Pre-NMSL Speed Limit of 75 * Adopted the 65 mph speed limit on May 5, 1987 * On around April 4, the full House has approved legislation to set a cap at 65 miles per hour (mph) on the speed limit for Tennessee's highways. The bill, that is sponsored by Rep. Ed Haley (R-Millington) is in response to federal action to give states more authority in setting their own speed limits. * In 1996 Tennessee safety and transportation officials will be looking at 840 miles of divided four-lane highways that are currently set at a speed limit of 55 mph to determine the safety factors for increasing the speed to 65 mph," said Rep. Haley "The legislation also effects the federally mandated speed limit in metropolitan areas where a 55 mph was imposed even in the outlying portions that may not be congested. Counties and cities would still have control over the speed limit in their boundaries under the bill." * Apparently some of the changes have taken effect as new limits are posted in some areas, in particular interstate 181 between Kinsport and Johnson City. * The Department of Transportation is expected to look at surrounding states as they alter their limits and come back in 1997 with recommendations in regard to the safety of any further action to lift limits higher. These experts will be carefully considering the safety factors as they come forth with their report. * A new Bill, SB 54 would raise the maximum speed limit to 70 mph. It is being opposed by the state Safety Department, which claims speed is the top contributing factor in highway deaths. * A similar bill is sponsored in the House by Rep. Tim Burchett (R-Knoxville). Consideration of the bill has been postponed until April 1. The Senate should consider SB54 March 26. * However, With Gov. Don Sundquist applying pressure, state lawmakers have slammed the brakes on legislation to raise the speed limit to 70 mph on Tennessee's interstate highways. The prime House sponsor, a Republican motorcycle enthusiast from Knoxville, gave up on the proposal when he realized he couldn't muster enough votes to free his bill from a subcommittee. But after delaying consideration of his bill until next year, Rep. Tim Burchett vowed to try again then. * http://www.inaugural.state.tn.us/hp/sundquist/trans.html * Tenn. WWW Home Page (No Leg Info) Texas (9/6/97) * News Summary: Cites now have the option of increasing the speed limits for urban interstates from 55 to 70 mph under a new law signed into law. Some speed limits in the Houston area will be increased this fall. The bill which would have lowered speed limits from 70 to 60 on some 2 lane roads was defeated. * Had a Pre-NMSL Speed Limit of 70 * Adopted the 65 mph speed limit on May 9, 1987 * Went to 70 mph on interstates and divided highways on December 8, 1995 * The speed limit on undivided U.S., State, farm-to-market, and ranch-to-market roads will go to seventy (70) as soon as signs are posted, which should be in early May of 1996. Nighttime speed limits on these roads should revert back to the pre-NMSL limit of 65. * However not all Texas farm-to-market roads will stay 70. TXDOT will has evaluated the conditions of all FM roads and decided not all can handle 70. About a quarter will be 55, some will be 60 or 65, and the rest will stay 70. See TDOT's Press Release on the issue for more info. * Trucks limit to 60 mph day, 55 night. * School buses limit to 50 mph * Texas House Bill 122 (1997) would have essentially eliminates separate truck limits which are currently set at 60 day/55 night. However, it apparently died when the Legislature adjourned. It won't meet again until 1999. It also would have allowed school busses to travel 55 MPH only on interstate highways, which is up from the current blanket limit of 50 MPH everywhere. It also leaves in place the 45 MPH speed limit for house trailers longer than 32 feet or heavier than 4500 lbs. House Bill 390 will basically do the same thing. House Bill 869 will keep the speed limit for trucks but raise the speed limit for house trailers to 55 and for school buses to 55 on freeways. Both of these bills apparently died too. * Gov. Bush signed SB161. It allows the governing bodies of counties with more than 2.8 million people to establish speed limits of up to 70 mph on limited-access highways in their jurisdiction. * Higher speed limits will come to the Houston area this fall. The Harris County Commissioners Court unanimously passed a bill on the week of July 4th directing the county's toll authority to increase the speed limit on county toll roads from 55 to 70 mph for cars during the daytime to take advantage of this new bill. Cars will be limited to 65 mph at night; trucks may not drive faster than 60 mph during the daytime and 55 mph at night. Higher limit will not take effect until signs are posted, and that could take until November 1 since the toll authority must accept bids and award a contract for sign replacement. * Speed limits on some farm-to-market and ranch-to-market roads would have droped from 70 mph to 60 mph during the day and go from 65 mph to 55 mph at night under the bill, which passed the senate but was defeated in the house. Ogden's bill would affect two-lane rural roads that don't have paved shoulders and that have a pavement width of 20 feet or less. Many of the roads cut through small towns, carry slow-moving agricultural traffic, and are crisscrossed by low-speed side roads. * (5/23) The Texas DOT is holding statewide hearings on speed limits. Here is a listing of dates and locations. * State DOT Site: http://www.dot.state.tx.us/ * Texas Legislature Online (Bill Text and Status) Utah (5/22/96) * Had a Pre-NMSL Speed Limit of 70 * Adopted the 65 mph speed limit on May 21, 1987 * Legislative action was required to raise the speed limit. * House Bill 29 was signed into law on Feb 29,1996. This bill sets the maximum speed limit at 75 mph on Interstates and 65 in other locations. * Most rural interstates went to 75 on June 1, 1996. (See UDOT's Press release for more info) Most urban interstates and other four-laners have been raised to 65 sometime between Feb 29 and Jun 1. * Utah State Legislature (Bill Info and Status) * State DOT site: http://www.sr.ex.state.ut.us/ Vermont * Had a Pre-NMSL Speed Limit of 65 * Adopted the 65 mph speed limit on April 22, 1987 * Has a 2 Lane Limit speed limit of 50 mph. * Administrative action by state traffic commission is required to raise the speed limit. * General Assembly Information (Bill Info, Current Law) Virginia (2/03/97) * Had a Pre-NMSL Speed Limit of 70 * Adopted the 65 mph speed limit on July 1, 1987 * Legislative action is required to raise the speed limit. * There is a special commission studying the speed limit issue now (Nov 96), and they will report to the Legislature soon. It is important to note that the Governor supports higher limits, so the time to strike is now. Remember how badly these efforts failed earlier this year? Make sure it doesn't happen again by writing your Delegate and Senator. Parts of North Carolina and Georgia are already posted at 70, so that should help. * However, it appears that the 1997 legislative session passed with out any speed limit bills being passed. * In the 1996 session The Virginia Senate Transportation Committee killed a bill that would have raised speed limits to 70 mph on some rural highways and The House voted 64-35 to kill a proposal allowing the Department of Transportation to raise the speed limit to 65 mph on all interstate highways and to 60 mph on some four-lane highways. Sen. Emmett Hanger, the Augusta County Republican who sponsored the Senate bill, said the measure is dead. He said senators wanted to study speed limits before raising them. However, a bill raising the speed limit to 65 on the Dulles greenway passed and is now in effect * Virginia General Assembly (Bill test and Status) * State DOT Site: http://www.vdot.state.va.us/ Washington * Had a Pre-NMSL Speed Limit of 70 * Adopted the 65 mph speed limit on April 20, 1987 * Administrative action by state DOT was required to raise the speed limit. * The State announced a Speed limit increase of 70 mph on rural interstates and 60 mph on urban interstates on March 8, 1996. Crews will begin posting new speed limit signs on March 11. Even the state AAA praised the increase. Apparently the "rural" designation will be extended slightly into at least one area that had always been "urban." * By the end 1996, the WA Secretary of Transportation expects to propose "other" speed limit increases for state highways. * 60 mph for vehicles over 10,000 pounds gross weight (large trucks) and vehicles in combination (trucks with trailers, for instance). * The state has also increased sections of US 2, US 195, and SR 26 to 60-65mph on the on the week of July 22. (Some sections were divided, but most sections were undivide) And US 395 between the two interstates to 70. See their Press Release for more info. * Washington Interstate Speed Limit Proposal * Washington State Legislature (Bill Text and Status) * State DOT Site: http://www.wsdot.wa.gov/ West Virginia (9/6/97) * News Summary: From August 25 to around September 6, West Virginia speed limits were increased from 65 to 70 on rural interstates, 55 to 65 on most divided highways and 60 on some urban stretches. * Had a Pre-NMSL Speed Limit of 70 * Adopted the 65 mph speed limit on April 20, 1987 * Administrative action by the commissioner of highways is required to raise the speed limit. * Highway Commissioner Fred VanKirk has been opposed to higher speed limits because he says the law is too lenient on those who break the speed limit on interstates and other divided highways by 1-10 mph (the penalty is a $5 plus court costs fine and no indication on your driving record) * An increase in the maximum speed limit on West Virginia freeways may be very near. On Monday, March 30, the house of Delegates passed a resolution calling on the Division of Highways to raise the speed limit to 70 on interstates and 65 on other four-lane roads. The resolution goes back to the Senate. Originally, the resolution only called for a study on US 50 between Clarksburg and Parkersburg and on US 119 south of Charleston. The Senate passed a 65 mph speed limit for almost all four-lane roads last year. It will come up for a final vote sometime this week. If passed, West Virginia motorists would get to legally drive at 70 for the first time in 24 years. This would, if passed, make West Virginia the 25th state with a speed limit of 70 or higher. * The Senate passed on a voice vote the House Concurrent Resolution requesting the Division of Highways to increase the speed limit on all interstates to 70 mph and on all four-lane highways to 65. Sen. Frank Deem, R-Wood, later asked the Senate to reconsider its action, but his motion was defeated by a 22-12 margin. * As a result of HCR 21, the state Division of Highways is now studying the speed limit raises it prescribes. One problem. They will be using radar guns to measure people's speeds. * The research is done and speed limits are going up this week and next! On August 22, West Virginia Transportation Secretary Richard Jemiola announced that, starting August 25, the speed limit will be raised to 70 on rural interstates, 65 on other rural four-lane highways, and 60 on certain, not all, urban interstates. * Thee following speed limits went up: Interstate 64: from 65 to 70 between exits 15 and 53; 55 to 60 between exits 53 and 58A; 65 to 70 from the I-77 split in Beckley to the Virginia state line; trucks still 45 on Sandstone Mt. downgrades Interstate 68: from 65 to 70, entire length; trucks still 50 on Cheat Mt. downgrades Interstate 70: from 65 to 70 from Wheeling to Pennsylvania state line Interstate 77: from 65 to 70 from Virginia state line to exit 60; from 65 to 70 between exits 85 and 95; from 55 to 60 between exits 95 and 98; from 65 to 70 between exit 102 and Ohio state line Interstate 79: from 65 to 70, entire length Interstate 81: from 65 to 70, entire length U. S. 19: from 55 to 65 from Beckley to Oak Hill, from Fayetteville to Summersville, and north of Summersville to I-79 after 4-laning completed U. S. 22: from 55 to 60, entire length U. S. 33: from 55 to 65 from I-79 to end of 4-lane segment at Elkins; will be 65 as new sections built north and east of Elkins U. S. 50: from 55 to 65 between I-77 and Clarksburg; proposed Parkersburg bypass will be 65 to the Ohio state line. U. S. 119: from 55 to 65 south of Southridge Center in South Charleston to Kentucky state line U. S. 340 and Charles Town Bypass: from 55 to 60 on 4-lane segments U. S. 460: from 55 to 65 from I-77 to Virginia state line at Glyn Lyn, Virginia * Last year, Senator Randy Schoonover (D-Greenbrier) introduced SB 253, which would have raised the speed limit to 70 on all rural interstates and 65 on all other divided and interstate highways * Governor Cecil Underwood has not stated his opinion on the speed limit issue. There is a link to e-mail him if you will follow the link on his name. * See the Raise West Virginia's Speed Limits! page for more info and to help get the limit raised in 1997. * State DOT Site: http://www.state.wv.us/wvdot/wvtrans.htm * Directory of West Virginia Legislators and Some Other Officials * State of West Virginia (No Leg. Info Yet) Wisconsin (5/16/96) * Had a Pre-NMSL Speed Limit of 70 * Adopted the 65 mph speed limit on July 17, 1987 * Legislative action is required to raise the speed limit. * Governor Thompson signed a bill allowing 65 mph speed limits to be posted on certain limited-access roads, both two-lane and four-lane. WI DOT has been surveying the state's roads since December of 1995 so the changes should be made soon. Some of the affected roads are: US 151, I-94, I-43, I-90, US 12, US 41, US 16. * State DOT Site: http://www.dot.state.wi.us/ * Wisconsin State Legislature (Bill Text and Status) Wyoming (5/22/96) * Had a Pre-NMSL Speed Limit of 75 * Adopted the 65 mph speed limit on May 19, 1987 * Went to 75 mph on most interstates on December 8, 1995. * The speed limits on Interstate 25 through Cheyenne and Casper is 60 mph. All other Interstate speed limits are 75 mph. (There are no other urban areas by NMSL standards) MOST other two-lane roads are 65, but there are several exceptions; urban areas, mountains, canyons etc. Non-Interstate divided highways are 65 or lower. * Wyoming Legislative Services Office (Bill Text, Current Law) ---------------------------------------------------------------------- 5) SUMMARY SUMMARY ---------------------------------------------------------------------- Daytime Interstate Speed Limit: # Of States | 55 60 65 70 75 80 85 None ---------------------------------------------------- Pre-NMSL 0 4 5 29 10 0 0 2 Post-NMSL 3 0 20 16 10 0 0 1 Prevailing Speed: | 60 65 70 75 None -------------------------------------------------------- Pre-NMSL (1) | 65-70 66-69 71-76 72-76 76-77 See a pattern here? Note how the pre-NMSL speed limits generally equaled the speed of traffic. Also notice how when there was NO speed limit traffic didn't go above 80. Something that will hopefully comeback once the NMSL is repealed. Notice also how only 10 states had speed limits of 65 or less. (1) Estimated speed. They didn't use the the 85th percentile rule (prevailing speed) back them. Source: "Pre NMSL data" {pre-NMSL} ---------------------------------------------------------------------- 6) ORIGINAL SUMMARY CHART ---------------------------------------------------------------------- A ? by a field means that I or the provider is unsure of it. A \ on the dates means I or the provider is unsure of the exact date. A ~ After the New Speed Limits means I or the provider is unsure what type of roads it will apply for. A ' After a Speed Limits means the special limit applies for all classes of roads. A * After a Speed Limits means "kind of", see the Detailed List for more info (by cliking on the state's name). A Speed Limit in "()" means that it is being considered A Speed Limit in "()?" means that there is a chance of it happening but its not likely. A Speed Limit in "[]" means that the new limit has yet to go into effect. A date for the post-NMSL limits means that it is a done deal. No date means I am unsure. A %% Means the 85th percentile rule A 00 Means a Reasonable & Prudent Speed Limit A SD = See Detailed list (click on the states's name) Any name in {} is a filename at my site (http://sunsite.unc.edu/rdu/) add .txt or .html. A "Study" means a study is underway A "Pos leg" means legislative action is possible or it is being considered A "Pos" means the state is considering increases For a detailed breakdown of any state click on its name. /--Action(s) required to raise speed limits | | /--What the new limits will be now that mandate is gone | | (Rural Freeways/Divided/UnDivided//Urban Freeways) | | | | /--What the old interstate daytime speed limits | | | were before the mandate. | | | | | | /--Date the New Limit goes into effect/ | | | | Truck Weight | | | | /--Date the 65 went into effect | | | | | State |a|Post-NMSL |Pre-55|Change |65 When| Notes ---------------------------------------------------------------------------- Alabama |g| 70/65//65 | 70 | 96/05 | 87/07 | Alaska |d| | 70 | | 88/01 | Arizona | | 75 | 75 | 95/12 | 87/04 | | |(--/65/65//65) | | | | Arkansas |h| 70 | 75 | 96/08 | 87/04 | | | 65t | | | | California | | 70/65/55//65 | 70 | 96/01 | 87/05 | Anti Speed Trap (SD) | | --/--/65* | | | | | | 55'c | | | | Colorado |l| 75/65/65 | 70 | 96/05 | 87/04 | | |(55't) | | | | Conn. |T|(60) | 60 | | NOT! | 2 Lane Limit: 50 Delaware |D| 65 | 60 | 96/01 | N ELG | 2 Lane Limit: 50 Florida |D| 70/65 | 70 | 96/04 | 87/04 | Georgia |l| 70/65//65 | 70 | 96/07 | 88/02 | Hawaii |l| | 70 | | NOT! | 2 Lane Limit: 45 Idaho |l| 75/65/65 | 70 | 96/05 | 87/05 | Illinois |D| --/65/55 | 70 | 95\12 | 87/04 | | | --/--/--//65* | | | | | | 55't | | | | Indiana |D| 65 | 70 | | 87/06 | Iowa |l| //65* | 75 | 96/03 | 87/05 | Kansas | | 70/70/65 | 75 | 96/03 | 87/05 | Was 80 on Turnpike (SD) Kentucky |l| | 70 | | 87/06 | Louisiana |h| 70/65//60 | 70 | 97/07 | 87/04 | Maine |D| | 70 | | 87/06 | Mass. |l| 65/65//65 | 65 | 96/01 | 92/01 | Maryland |l| //60* | 70 | 06/07 | 95/07 | Michigan |l| 70//65 | 70 | 97/01 | 87/11 | | | 55't | | | | | |(70//65t)? | | | | Minnesota |t| 70/65//65 | 65 | 97/06 | 87/06 | Miss. |t| 70/--/--//60 | 70 | 96/03 | 87/04 | | |[--/70/65] | | | | Missouri | | 70/70/60//60 | 70 | 96/03 | 87/05 | Montana | | 00/00/00d | None*| 95/12 | 87/04 | $5 Ticket (SD) | | 65/55/55n | | | | | | 65/60/60t | | 8000 | | Nebraska | | 75/65/60 | 75 | 96/06 | 87/04 | Nevada | | 75/70/70//65 | None | 95/12 | 87/04 | Resisted 55 (SD) N. Hamp. |g| | 70 | | 87/04 | New Jersey |a|(65)? | 60* | | NOT! | 2 Lane Limit: 50 New Mexico |h| 75/70/65 | 70 | 96\02 | 87/04 | New York |l| //65* | 65 | 96/07 | 95/08 | N Carolina |D| 70//65 | 70 | 96/08 | 87/08 | N Dakota |D| 70/65/65d | 75 | 96/07 | 87/04 | | | 70/55/55n | | | | Ohio |l| --/65//65 | 70 | 96\05 | 87/07 | | | 55't | | 8000 | | Oklahoma | | 70/70/65//60d | 70 | 95/12 | 87/04 | | | 70/65/55//60n | | | | | | 60/60/55//60t | | | | | | 55/55/55//55y | | | | | | 65/50~s | | | | | | 75*d | | | | | | 75*n | | | | | |[75/--/65//65] | | | | Oregon |D| | 75 | | 87/09 | Penn. |l|(//65) | 65 | | 95/07 | R. Island |T| 65 | 60 | 96/05 | NOT! | 2 Lane Limit: 50 S Carolina |D| | 70 | | 87/08 | S Dakota | | 75/65/65 | 75 | 96/04 | 87/04 | | | 65/55/55t | | | | Tennessee | | --/65//65 | 75 | 96\07 | 87/05 | Texas | | 70/70/70d | 70 | 95/12 | 87/05 | | | 65/65/65n | | | | | | //70*d | | | | | | 60/60/60t | | | | | | 55/55/55y | | | | | | 50's | | | | Utah |l| 75/65//65 | 70 | 96/06 | 87/05 | Vermont |T| | 65 | | 87/04 | 2 Lane Limit: 50 Virginia |l| | 70 | | 88/07 | Washington |D| 70/--/--//60 | 70 | 96/03 | 87/04 | | | --/70/65* | | | | | | 60't | | 10000 | | W Virginia |h| 70/65//60 | 70 | 97/08 | 87/04 | Wisconsin |l| | 70 | | 87/06 | Wyoming | | 75/65/65//60 | 75 | 95/12 | 87/05 | * For Montana: Daytime only, 55 non-interstate/65 interstate night limit * For New Jersey: The Atlantic City Expressway was 70 mph and the southernmost 80 miles the Garden State Parkway was posted at 65. Actions required to raise speed limits: a administrative action d administrative action by state DOT & public safety D administrative action by state DOT g administrative action by governor h administrative action by highway commission/department l legislative action t administrative action by transportation commissioners T administrative action by state traffic commission Post NMSL Speed Limits: d daytime speed limit n night speed limit c combination vehicles speed limit t truck speed limit may include combination vehicles y truck night speed limit s school bus speed limit ---------------------------------------------------------------------- 7) CREDITS Etc. ---------------------------------------------------------------------- Copyright (c) 1997 by Kevin Atkinson. A service of the "Reasonable Drivers Unanimous" home page available at http://sunsite.unc.edu/rdu/. Special thanks to the National Coalition for the Abolition of Speed Limits (NCASL) and the National Motorist Association (NMA) for providing a lot of this info. The NCASL is a newly formed group that advocates the abolition of all speed limits except in large cities, business districts, and residential areas. For more information see there web page at http://www.missouri.edu/~c669885/ncasl.html. The NMA is the only real drivers rights organization in North America. They are the ones that got the NMSL repealed in the first place. For more information see there web page at http://www.motorists.com/ or contact them at 608/849-6000; nma@motorists.com or 6678 Pertzborn Road, Dane, Wisconsin 53529. All of the information in this chart comes from offical or semi-offical sources. Source for Pre-NMSL speed limits: Federal Highway Administration, 1972 except for NC and NJ. Sources for the 65 dates: High Risk States, Table 3 Unknown Risk States, Table 4, States at Risk. AHAS Press Release, Nov13 1995. Advocates for Highway and Auto Safety Unknown source from the insurance company. Some of the sources for the post-NMSL data: NCASL NMA AAA "A state-by-state look at speed limits" by the associated press, USA Today Online "DOA States" by Advocates for Highway and Auto Safety (http://www.saferoads.org/press/95/strisk/table2.html) ========= WAS CANCELLED BY =======: Rogue cancel from Michael Enlow, X-Cancelled-by etc. are forged. Further information can be acquired at http://www.sputum.com/ucepage.htm, or http://rampages.onramp.net/~eholmes/enlow/enlowce.html You can express your displeasure with Mr. Enlow by contacting him at: enlow@direcpc.com Control: cancel <62cb5l$b7m$1@fddinewz.oit.unc.edu> Newsgroups: news.answers Path: ...!news.hn.netlink.co.nz!canterbury.ac.nz!southpower.co.nz!nobody From: rra@eyrie.org,sw@eyrie.org,rgm@eyrie.org Subject: cmsg cancel <62cb5l$b7m$1@fddinewz.oit.unc.edu> Approved: rra@eyrie.org,sw@eyrie.org,rgm@eyrie.org Message-ID: <cancel.62cb5l$b7m$1@fddinewz.oit.unc.edu> X-No-Archive: Yes Sender: kevina@clark.net (Kevin Atkinson) X-Cancelled-By: rra@eyrie.org,sw@eyrie.org,rgm@eyrie.org Organization: Southpower Ltd Date: Sun, 19 Oct 1997 18:58:58 GMT Lines: 2 This article cancelled within Tin.